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What should I do if my employer is forcing me to work with the people who sexually harassed me?

Barnesville, PA |

My employer recognizes that these people sexually harassed me (in a non physical way), but they have not relocated/reassigned the employees which means I am forced to work with them on a regular basis. What should I do?

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Attorney answers 3

Posted

You should set up an appointment with an attorney who handles EEOC sexual discrimination cases in your state. In most states these attorneys accept cases like this on a percentage fee basis and most attorneys do not charge for the initial consultation.

If this information has been helpful, please indicate below. I hope my information is helpful to you. If you think this post was a good answer, please click the "Good Answer" button below and/or designate my answer as the "BEST ANSWER". Thanks. This is a general response to a question for basic information and is not legal advice. Legal advice can only be given when all of the facts of your situation are discussed with a lawyer, which we have not done.. If you reside outside the State of Texas please understand that the laws may be different from the laws that I may cite in a my comment. This comment is not to be construed as legal advice to your particular situation because there are many factors that influence legal counseling- this is simply a comment. Response to an email does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Offices of Kevin R. Madison, P.C., nor any of its attorneys. If you send us an e-mail, or call us, and we do not already represent you, neither your e-mail inquiry nor telephone call will create an attorney-client relationship. E-mails cannot necessarily be treated as privileged or confidential. Only entering into a written legal services contract with the Law Offices of Kevin R. Madison, P.C. will create an attorney-client relationship. There is no substitute for one-on-one legal advice and you are urged to meet with an attorney and discuss your case, personally, with an attorney in the state in which you reside or your case occurred. Thank you. Kevin R. Madison. Visit our website at www.kevinmadison.com and www.texassexualharassmentattorney.com. Kevin Madison, Austin, Texas- representing injured persons in motor vehicle collision, truck and motorcucle accidents and representing victims of sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual abuse, physical assaults, and representing victims of sexual exploitation committed by doctors, therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, clergy, counselors, priests, and rabbis. Visit our sexual harassment/sexual exploitation blog at http://texassexualharassmentattorney.com/blog/

Asker

Posted

I have tried contacting numerous attorneys in my state....of the few that actually contacted me back, they all said that payment is required up front in cash. I can't even find a lawyer with a free consultation hahaha

Norman Antonio Stiteler

Norman Antonio Stiteler

Posted

In some areas of Pennsylvania it might be difficult to find an attorney with the necessary skills to either provide advice or manage this sort of a matter. Penn State University Law School maintains some clinics and it is possible you could find some legal advice there. The Community Law Clinic is located at 371 W. South Street in Carlisle, PA. Please call the Clinic at (717) 243-2968 for more information or to find out if you qualify for assistance. The Clinic fax number is 717-241-3596.

Norman Antonio Stiteler

Norman Antonio Stiteler

Posted

Make certain you call to ask iof they can help, don't drive over there only to discover they don't take this sort of case.

Asker

Posted

Thanks so much for the info!

Posted

In general, I agree with Attorney Madison, you should see an attorney and follow his advice. However, I do have a question. You note that your employer 'recognizes' that these people sexually harass you, you need to be clear as to how your employer 'recognizes it'. Have you complained to him and he admitted that it is occurring; or are you assuming that he knows about it? It is a small difference but an important one.

I am licensed in New Mexico and Pennsylvania, and therefore any discussion of issues related to other states must considered within that context. In addition, my comments are not intended to create a legal representation but merely to respond to the limited facts presented by the question. Any opinion herein is not meant as a precise statement of legal rights or as a recommendation of any particular course of action. A more complete legal review can be obtained through local counsel.

Asker

Posted

Some of my harassers actually admitted to HR staff that they harassed me. I know this because 1 of the harassers started telling everyone in their workgroup about it as soon as they got out of the meeting with HR. Word got back to me. Another one of the harassers came out of their meeting with HR and made retaliatory statements towards one of my coworkers (a friend of mine) regarding this situation. I reported both of these things to HR and the HR rep basically agreed with the information provided and also addressed the retaliatory statements. They did not stop the harassment. The day after HR closed their investigation, someone approached me with the harassment again. I also reported that. HR "investigated" that, and then closed their case. They said they took action against the offenders but their policy is to not share the details of those actions with me.

Norman Antonio Stiteler

Norman Antonio Stiteler

Posted

Under these circumstances I would definitely suggest you see an attorney.

Kevin Rindler Madison

Kevin Rindler Madison

Posted

You should set up an appointment with an attorney who handles EEOC sexual discrimination cases in your state. In most states these attorneys accept cases like this on a percentage fee basis and most attorneys do not charge for the initial consultation.

Posted

Depends on the facts. If it was just trivial harassment, I would simply try to work with the employees, but if it was major, you need to see an employment lawyer. Sometimes it is hard to move people in a small company, so how large your employer is may be an issue.

Kevin Rindler Madison

Kevin Rindler Madison

Posted

You should set up an appointment with an attorney who handles EEOC sexual discrimination cases in your state. In most states these attorneys accept cases like this on a percentage fee basis and most attorneys do not charge for the initial consultation.

Asker

Posted

What is considered "trivial" harassment? The company is large. At our job site there are approx 1500 workers and we are part of a much larger corporation.

Edward Clement Sweeney

Edward Clement Sweeney

Posted

Just call up a lawyer and ask the lawyer! You shouldn't be airing everything in an e-mail with specificity anyway as it could prejudice your position.