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Orders to a civilian

Eugene, OR |

I don't know if there is a legal essay somewhere about this, the question would be when a civilian may receive orders, and from whom ?

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Attorney answers 3

Posted

Your question is very unclear. I apologize, it is just a very open question. I think this is probably based upon a particular situation that has occurred. If so, do not share the details on line. Speak to an attorney regarding this if it is something that involves open litigation or the possibility of litigation or charges.

Posted

I'm not sure I understand the question. Civilians, by definition, are not part of the military hierarchy, and so can't be "issued orders" by military personnel. Of course, military personnel may enforce the military's rules concerning restricted areas and protection of military assets (so, for example, a soldier can "order" a civilian to keep off a military installation, &c.).

Please read the following notice: <br> <br> Jay Bodzin is licensed to practice law in the State of Oregon and the Federal District of Oregon, and cannot give advice about the laws of other jurisdictions. All comments on this site are intended for informational purposes only, and do not constitute legal advice or create an attorney-client relationship. No posts or comments on this site are in any way confidential. Each case is unique. You are advised to have counsel at all stages of any legal proceeding, and to speak with your own lawyer in private to get advice about your specific situation. <br> <br> Jay Bodzin, Northwest Law Office, 2075 SW First Avenue, Suite 2J, Portland, OR 97201 | Telephone: 503-227-0965 | Facsimile: 503-345-0926 | Email: jay@northwestlawoffice.com | Online: www.northwestlawoffice.com

Asker

Posted

Thank you for your response. What other organizations employees may be able to order (interfere) a civilian in DMZ area?

Jay Bodzin

Jay Bodzin

Posted

I really do not know. My understanding is that anything we dub a 'demilitarized zone' is generally fairly closely watched by military forces (read: North and South Korea; Palestine, &c.) and civilians would be well advised to tread carefully. It's impossible to answer this question without specific details, which you shouldn't give over the internet. Consult with a lawyer who specializes in military or international law, or call the State Department.

Asker

Posted

Thank you for your response. For more specific details, you may consider which employees of city/county/state/federal government , for profit/non for profit organizations/religious and when may be able to order (interfere) a civilian?

Jay Bodzin

Jay Bodzin

Posted

I'm sorry, I don't understand what you're saying. I don't think that sentence really made grammatical sense. Look, in practice, the person who 'can' order someone to do something is always the person who has the most firepower available, and the belief that they're allowed to use it. Determining whether that order was lawful is something that has to be done later, when not in the field. If you find yourself being ordered to do something by a military officer in a 'DMZ,' you will not find it very helpful to your interests to know that someone from the internet once told you that they don't have the legal authority to tell you to do it. You have to do what you must to survive. That's the best advice I can give.

Posted

Civilians may receive orders from a court that must be adhered to.

Civilians do not receive militarty orders.

The practice area and tags you indicated point toward family law and DV--not sure why you posted this in the military section--can you add additional facts to your question so we can get a better idea of your situation?

READ THIS BEFORE CALLING OR EMAILING ME: I am licensed to practice before the state and federal courts in Virginia. We have not established an attorney-client relationship unless we have a signed representation agreement and you have paid me. I am providing educational instruction only--not legal advice. You should speak with an attorney to whom you have provided all the facts, before you take steps that may impact your legal rights. I am not obligated to answer subsequent emails or phone calls unless you have hired me. I wish you the best of luck with your situation.

Philip Douglas Cave

Philip Douglas Cave

Posted

Of course, if you are a DOD employed civilian that might be different.

Asker

Posted

Thank you for your responses. The question is not for a DOD employed civilian. It tries to find out the authorities and agents which may order or may stop a civilian and when. Orders might not necessary be real time orders only, like a court order not in an open court. The stop might refer to a stop during a work, an educational, a health care or a personal activity.

Rixon Charles Rafter III

Rixon Charles Rafter III

Posted

Well, I don't understand the comment any better than the original question I am sorry to say. What do you mean by 'order', 'authority', 'agents', 'real time' and 'stop'.

Asker

Posted

Order means a direction that something be done or that there is prohibition against some act, or to perform a particular act or refrain from certain acts. A stop would refer to the prohibition part. Real-time denotes orders delivered and interfering with an ongoing work, educational, health care or a personal activity as opposed to a letter sent by snail mail. Authority refers to the governing body upon which such authority (claim of legitimacy, the justification and right to exercise that power) is vested. Agent refers to an agent of the Authority, one who acts for, or in the place of, or entrusted with the power of the Authority.

Rixon Charles Rafter III

Rixon Charles Rafter III

Posted

Yes, I have a dictionary too, but I meant what do YOU mean by those terms relative to a specific situation--since you've not posted anything of substance, I think we've run the course on this posting. Best of luck to you.

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