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Im being charged with giving false information to a police officer in NJ; what is the penalty for that ?

Beverly, NJ |

I was with a friend who was in an accident; she thought the person who hit her left the scene so she also left. Soon after we were pulled over and when the police asked my name, i told them a false one because I thought I had a warrant , which it turns out, I did not. Im trying to find out what happens now and how much trouble Im in.

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Attorney answers 5

Posted

Why are you first concerned about the penalties?

What if the State cannot prove the charges?

Check out the below link to see what the State has to prove.

http://www.judiciary.state.nj.us/criminal/charges/falsrep.pdf

Is that the statute that you were charged with?

Until retained, this answer does not constitute legal advise, as it is based on extremely limited information.

Asker

Posted

The statute im being charged with is 2C: 29-3A (7)

Christopher J Basner

Christopher J Basner

Posted

Below is what the State would need to prove. http://www.judiciary.state.nj.us/criminal/charges/hinder1.pdf The grading of the charge depends upon the facts of the case. How much jail time am I facing? The jail time that a person who pleads guilty to or is convicted of an indictable offense varies based on many factors. Some of the factors are as follows: prior record, the nature of any prior record, and the degree of the current charge. Other factors may apply, so discuss potential incarceration with your attorney in detail. A first degree crime carries a potential penalty of 10-20 years in prison. A second degree crime carries a potential penalty of 5-10 years in prison. An individual convicted of a first or second degree crime will face a presumption of incarceration; this presumption may be overcome in some cases. A person who pleads guilty to or is convicted of a third degree crime may face a jail sentence of 3-5 years. A fourth degree crime may result in a potential penalty of up to 18 months incarceration. There is a presumption of non-custodial sentences on 3rd and 4th degree offenses; that is not a guarantee that a defendant will not face jail time on a third or fourth degree charge. It is obvious that any indictable offense may result in serious consequences.

Posted

If you are convicted, the charge is a disorderly persons offense. It is punishable by up to 6 months in jail, but unless you have a horrible criminal history, your likely penalties are a fine and maybe probation. You would have a criminal record, though.
There may be some defenses to the charges. You should explore this with a lawyer before deciding what to do.

Posted

This sounds like a disorderly persons offense, which carries a possible sentence of up to 6 months in jail and $1000 fine. Now you will be arraigned in the municipal court where this happened. Make sure the court knows what your address is or you won't get the notice and really get a warrant.

Posted

This is a DP but based on your post you are not guilty of anything.You were not hindering because there was no warrant nor were you obstructing.

Posted

If this is a disorderly persons offense, there is a possible sentence of up to 6 months in jail and $1000 fine, plus court costs. You may want to hire an attorney, at a reasonable rate, to see if this could be plead to a lesser offense, like a municipal ordinance. .

Do NOT rely on this answer as the information provided here is not legal advice nor is it a substitute for legal advice which requires a consultation with a lawyer. This response does not create an attorney-client relationship.