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How Is The Monthly Amount Of Social Security Disability Payments Configured?

Houston, TX |

How is the SSDI benefit amount calculated? Is it an average of income (or FICA paid) based upon the last day of SGA, the accepted onset date, the date of application, the date of favorable decision, etc? If one received a favorable decision, what variables are taken into consideration for determining the benefit amount? For each Social Security yearly statement, there is a section that reads "if you became disabled right now, your payment would be about..." how accurate is that calculation?

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Attorney answers 3

Posted

The annual statement one receives from Social Security are estimates. When Social Security disability benefits are awarded, the benefit amount is the claimant's "principal insurance amount" (PIA) which is calculated based on earnings taxed. That number is unique to every wage-earner, and the formula is available on www.ssa.gov. The first month in pay status will be the month following the 5-calendar-month "waiting period" after the onset date determined in the favorable decision.
This information will be included in a Notice of Award issued days or weeks after the decision.

Best wishes for an outcome you can understand, and please remember to designate a best answer.

This answer is offered as a public service for general information only and may not be relied upon as legal advice.

Asker

Posted

So it's a calculation of ALL earnings from the first days of employment to the last (considering FICA was included)? I heard some people talk about (maybe I read about) where part of the calculation is based upon the average yearly income (even including the years where one stopped working). If that is true, then it would seem to me one's benefit amount could decrease if they didn't apply for benefits until years after they last earned SGA.

Paula Brown Sinclair

Paula Brown Sinclair

Posted

Neither version is correct. If you are adept enough to navigate Avvo, you can search www.ssa.gov. Go there to find out hos PIA is calculated..

Asker

Posted

You know what? You are THE rudest person on this ENTIRE website. I don't know how many responses I have read of yours where you are constantly rude, crass, short, and belittle the people who come here asking for help (and they aren't even asking for YOUR help, yet you feel the need to answer everyone's post with your tacky comments). It's quite obvious I (or anyone for that matter) could use the Internet to ask any and all of the questions that are posted here, yet people choose this particular source for a reason. If you feel the need to respond with such bitter and unnecessary comments, then let me give you a tip: SKIP the question. I have reported your tacky comments many times, and believe me, I will personally write to the highest ranking person I can find on this website and show them ALL the posts I have found where you consistently piss off the original poster with your better-than-thou attitude. You don't even read the damn questions half the time because your responses are nowhere near what's being asked. I have asked questions before where I had already a good idea of the answer, but I come here to ask for either clarification or validation. I certainly (nor anyone else) need your constant belittling just because the questions may be elementary for you. You are just a bitter, old lawyer who should find another outlet to express your misguided holiness.

Paula Brown Sinclair

Paula Brown Sinclair

Posted

Flagged for violation of TOS/Community Guidelines.

Posted

The estimate is fairly accurate as it is based on the information the SSA presently has on file. The amount could change if the information changes or new laws are enacted that alters the amount. You can find a quick estimate of earnings at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/quickcalc/index.html . It will provide an estimate based on the year you were born and the earnings on which you paid contribution.

Asker

Posted

Thank you for your reply. It seems to me that Ms. Sinclair could take a few lessons from you and the various lawyers on this forum on how to politely and properly answer questions. I don't know how many times I have read her tacky responses to others, but now that she's include me in that list, I'm not having it. Anyway, thanks again for your response. It actually validates what I previously thought, but apparently Sinclair shouldn't be bothered with such trivial questions.

Posted

The calculations you refer to are just estimates. The exact calculations are done by computer at the appropriate time- retirement, or when a disability claim is approved.

The exact answers to questions like this require more information than presented. The answer(s) provided should be considered general information. The information provided by this is general advice, and is not legal advice. Viewing this information is not intended to create, and does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. It is intended to educate the reader and a more definite answer should be based on a consultation with a lawyer. You should not take any action that might affect your claim without first seeking the professional opinion of an attorney. You should consult an attorney who can can ask all the appropriate questions and give legal advice based on the exact facts of your situation. The general information provided here does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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