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Do I need to take a DNA test to apply for a green card for my parents?

New York, NY |

As a naturalized US citizen, I am currently thinking of applying for green cards for both of my parents who reside abroad. Before going forward with the process, I want to know the following: will USCIS require that we take DNA tests to prove our lineage? Or will presenting the agency with birth certificates suffice to prove our familial relationship? Please let me know before I hire an attorney to move forward with my case.

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Attorney answers 5

Posted

DNA is not required. Sometimes it is HIGHLY suggested. This usually happends when the case goes abroad to the US consulate

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Neil I Fleischer (513) 977-4209 www.immigrate2usa.com Note: Neil Fleischer is an attorney licensed in the State of Ohio The below answer is provided for informational use only. One should not act or refrain to act solely based on the information provided. No attorney/client relationship is created unless an Agreement is signed by the attorney and the client. Best regards, Neil Neil I Fleischer The Fleischer Law Firm, LLC 917 Main Street Cincinnati, Ohio 45202-1314 Direct telephone: 513 977 4209 nfleischer@immigrate2usa.com Enjoy our Blog at http://immigrate2usa.blogspot.com/

Posted

You do not need a dna test if you have an original birth certificate with your parents listed as father and mother. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us. Good luck.
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Posted

The birth certificate should be sufficient. You should not have to submit to DNA testing. But you should nonetheless hire an immigration attorney to assist you with your application.

Jamahl C. Kersey (619) 399-3662 is an Immigration and Criminal Defense attorney licensed in CA. The answer above is provided for informational use only. One should not act or refrain to act solely based on the information provided. No attorney/client relationship is created unless an Agreement is signed by the attorney and the client. Best regards, Jamahl C. Kersey KERSEY & SABAWI 5703 Oberlin Drive Suite 201 San Diego, CA 92121 Tel: 619.399.3662 Fax: 888.765.5894 jamahl@kerseysabawi.com www.kerseysabawi.com

Posted

In general, the birth certificates and other evidence (we can guide you) are sufficient to provide the familial relationship. As my colleagues have properly pointed out, the U.S. Consulate could ask for a DNA test if there is information that might lead them to believe that the familial relationship specified (parent/child) does not exist. If you document the case with more then just the birth certificates then there is a good chance that you may be able to overcome the possibility of the DNA request by the Consulate. Nevertheless, a DNA test is ultimately discretionary to the U.S. Consulate Officer.

Posted

DNA tests are not normally required. They can be requested by USCIS if there is reason to believe that the claimed relationship is not legitimate.

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Jeffrey A. Devore, Esq.
Board Certified Immigration Attorney
Devore Law Group, P.A.
2925 PGA Blvd., Suite 204
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410
Telephone: (561) 478-5353
Facsimile: (561) 478-2144
Skype: jeffrey.a.devore
email: jdevore@devorelawgroup.com
web: www.devorelawgroup.com