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Confused about I-751 notice in mail

San Francisco, CA |

My ex husband committed marriage fraud. I reported him to the USCIS, An officer later contacted me with a few questions regarding him. I was told that he will be deported by the officer himself. I actually wrote about this previously, but related to another question about this situation. Here are a few questions about this: the letter was not one of the official Notices like when you get when you receive your green card. It was a regular plain white paper. What I am confused about is that the envelope was sent from Vermont while my ex lives in California and the letter was a reminder to jointly file for I-751 and said that he got his green card November 2011. I also notified the fraud officer about the finalized divorce and how my ex tried to claim abuse, but failed. I even sent 2 months

ago our divorce judgement, so the USCIS knows that we got a divorce, so why would the Vermont send my ex (to my address) a notification to JOINTLY remove the conditional status? It just does not make any sense to me. Since there is a fraud report and the officer also told me that he will interview my ex later on and wanted to get more info from me, why would then the letter from Vermont request my ex to remove the conditions jointly when we obviously can not do that, when my local USCIS officer is on the case and confirmed fraud himself from the circumstances and said they will deport him? My ex might apply for EB1A case, so could it be that he applied, they denied him and requested that he files it with me? Though...the very brief letter would have stated denial of his eb1a right? The white paper has a title "notice of requirement to file joint petition to remove the conditional basis of..." although the envelope had Vermont's address, the letter said "please forward Laguna Niguel..."

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Attorney answers 3

Best Answer
Posted

It sounds like a general type letter which is sent out to each applicant whose conditional residence is expiring. Because of its general nature, it would not be personalized to your circumstances. There is nothing you need to do about the letter.

Viera Buzgova (512) 476-7163. The information above is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice. The statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship. Answers on Avvo can only be general ones, as specific answers would require knowledge of all the facts. You should retain an attorney to review all the facts specific to your case in order to receive advice specific to your case.

Asker

Posted

Thank you...finally the most helpful answer I got. You are marked as helpful and best!

Posted

It would be much better if you showed the letter to an experienced immigration attorney.

(213) 394-4554 x0 Mr. Shusterman is a former INS Trial Attorney (1976-82) with over 35 years of immigration experience. His response to your question is general in nature, as not all the facts are known to him. You should retain an attorney experienced in immigration law to review all the facts in your case in order to receive advice specific to your case. Mr. Shusterman's statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship.

Asker

Posted

the letter does not contain much except a notice to jointly remove the conditions when we are already divorced, hence my confusion, since the uscis had received my divorce decree a while ago, plus the fraud report against him there. that's my point here and my confusion.

Posted

Ignore it and move on with your life.

J Charles Ferrari Eng & Nishimura 213.622.2255 The statement above is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice, as not all the facts are known. You should retain an attorney to review all the facts specific to your case in order to receive advise specific to your case. The statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship. Answers on Avvo can only be general ones, as specific answers would require knowledge of all the facts. As such, they may or may not apply to the question.