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City of Boston Knife Ordinance and Concealed Carry Weapon License

Boston, MA |

Can a person with a class A concealed carry weapons license legally carry a 3 inch folding pocket knife in the City of Boston or any other city for that matter which an 2 1/2 inch knife ordinance. I understand that that Worcester ordinance specifically allows Class A holders to carry knifes over 2 1/2 inches. Thanks.

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Attorney answers 2

Posted

There is no "Concealed Carry Weapon License" as such in MA. To carry a concealed handgun requires an LTC/A with no restrictions or "employment," etc. "Target & Hunting" and "Sporting" would not suffice.

While Worcester ties mere knives to a firearms license, so far as I know, Boston does not.

The foregoing is for general information purposes and does not establish an attorney-client relationship.

Posted

Also, you should be careful of carrying a knife generally because, if ever you are stopped and arrested, you might pick up a charge of carrying a dangerous weapon. Much depends on why type of knife it is (expressly prohibited by the statute, or per se dangerous or dangerous as used), and why you are carrying it. If the knife is not one that is intentionally designed for defense/offense against another person, such as a knife designed for carving wood or a knife designed for food prep, but you tell an officer you are carrying it to defend yourself, you could very well pick up a charge. It's generally not a good idea to walk around with a knife, unless you have an innocent reason for doing so and the knife is not one that is prohibited or pre se dangerous. Careful.

Keith G Langer

Keith G Langer

Posted

The controlling statute is MGL c. 269, s. 10: (b) Whoever, except as provided by law, carries on his person, or carries on his person or under his control in a vehicle, any stiletto, dagger or a device or case which enables a knife with a locking blade to be drawn at a locked position, any ballistic knife, or any knife with a detachable blade capable of being propelled by any mechanism, dirk knife, any knife having a double-edged blade, or a switch knife, or any knife having an automatic spring release device by which the blade is released from the handle, having a blade of over one and one-half inches, or a slung shot, blowgun, blackjack, metallic knuckles or knuckles of any substance which could be put to the same use with the same or similar effect as metallic knuckles, nunchaku, zoobow, also known as klackers or kung fu sticks, or any similar weapon consisting of two sicks of wood, plastic or metal connected at one end by a length of rope, chain, wire or leather, a shuriken or any similar pointed starlike object intended to injure a person when thrown, or any armband, made with leather which has metallic spikes, points or studs or any similar device made from any other substance or a cestus or similar material weighted with metal or other substance and worn on the hand, or a manrikigusari or similar length of chain having weighted ends; or whoever, when arrested upon a warrant for an alleged crime, or when arrested while committing a breach or disturbance of the public peace, is armed with or has on his person, or has on his person or under his control in a vehicle, a billy or other dangerous weapon other than those herein mentioned and those mentioned in paragraph (a), shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than two and one-half years nor more than five years in the state prison, or for not less than six months nor more than two and one-half years in a jail or house of correction, except that if the court finds that the defendant has not been previously convicted of a felony, he may be punished by a fine of not more than fifty dollars or by imprisonment for not more than two and one-half years in a jail or house of correction. Under which, a simple folding or assisted-opening knife does not fall. That does not mean some over-zealous officer won't try and claim it does, however.

Michael P. Gerace

Michael P. Gerace

Posted

In the cases, there are 3 categories of weapons--those prohibited under subsection a, those that are dangerous per se (a weapon designed to harm persons), and those that must be dangerous as used (such as a kitchen knife which, though intended for innocent purposes, could become dangerous if used that way). A simple folding knife, such as a jack knife, is exactly in this last category. If you get pulled over and arrested an they find the knife in your pocket, they will charge you. That doesn't mean that you could not win at trial or on appeal, but it means you will get charged nonetheless. There are many such cases. The defendant then has to show that the weapon was not dangerous as used--which might be hard to do in front of a jury. But it happens is the point.