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Case Management Conference set six months in future, am I allowed to move to force it to occur sooner?

Chicago, IL |

I filed a chancery injunction complaint on December 10, 2012 in Cook County. The Defendants are sophisticated and efficient and my presumption is that they will file an appearance and answer within 30 days of being served as is required. Today the case appeared on the electronic docket with the first hearing with the judge scheduled for June 10, 2013! I was a defendant in an emergency chancery action during the second quarter of 2011 and the attorneys for the Plaintiffs filed on April 21 and the hearing occurred on April 28. With respect to my December 10, 2012 filing, I had hoped for a hearing soon after the defendants are required to respond to my complaint. Can I move for this, or am I stuck with waiting six months?

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Attorney answers 3

Posted

Just a status date, something sooner can be motioned up.

Posted

You are being very foolish to represent yourself. By your own statement, the Defendants are sophisticated. You can get a hearing earlier than the routinely set 6 month status date. Don't attempt this on your own.

Asker

Posted

Ms. Goldstein: I am a Northwestern graduate, taught high school history and political science for three years. Your answers tend to always suggest hiring an attorney. Fair enough...but resorting to ad hominem attacks on me (videlicet "very foolish") is hurtful and non-generative

Asker

Posted

I am also a seminarian. Chancery Court used to be the king's court, and the word "prayer" carries over. So me coming with an aspirant's collar and vested makes me feel as though I'm not alone. :-)

Judy A. Goldstein

Judy A. Goldstein

Posted

Asker - I have 4 degrees, the last one being my law degree. I taught for 14 years before going to law school. I would not consider extracting my own tooth, or rewiring my house, despite my education and experience. If you took offense at my comments, then you are being overly sensitive as no insult was intended.

Asker

Posted

I apologize; this is a very hard time for my family and me. It means a lot that attorneys like you volunteer your time like this. Thank you

Posted

PLEASE hire an attorney. What usually happens when one is pursuing a temporary restraining order (“TRO”) is that a verified complaint is filed as well as a motion for TRO (with supporting affidavit and a supporting memorandum of law) and a notice of motion (notice must be given unless one has reason to believe that providing notice would somehow harm or destroy the substance of the litigation or defeat its purpose). A motion for a preliminary injunction is frequently combined with the TRO motion (alternate relief). This is complicated stuff so please sit down with an attorney and all relevant documents as soon as possible. If you're going to forge ahead on your own, make sure you have a copy of and thoroughly review the judge’s standing order. Hope this helps. Good luck.

Robert T. Kuehl
Kuehl Law, P.C.
Chicago, Illinois
312-840-8270
Email: bob@kuehllawpc.com
Website: www.kuehllawpc.com

Asker

Posted

It's not a temporary restraining order. Much more straightforward than that. Count I is the injunctive relief which just requests affidavits be submitted. Then there are several counts requesting transfer to civil or law divisions. The law is a very stratified profession, and I am one of 100,000s of thousands in the Greater Chicago Area who only have self-help since I do not have liquid funds to hire an attorney.