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Can i evict someone from a house which i inherited

Miami, FL |

some years ago my father died and left me a house , while my father was alive he took care of a boy from birth until the day he died , i left the house paid no bills etc for about 17 years , thinking that he would have moved , recently i heard that the young man has repaired the house and keeps all the bills paid , suppose i want to evict him could i do that

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Attorney answers 2

Posted

Your situation is likely are more complex than you want to believe. You can not evict him because he is not a common tenant. You would have to bring an ejectment action in circuit court, not an eviction action in county court. You could possibly win the ejectment action if you still have title. However, under the circumstances you described, once 7 years passed, it is possible that the now not so young man is the owner of that property by operation of adverse possession under the law. See an attorney asap. You'll need to put out some money for a title search and other investigations along with a legal opinion as to your present status regarding the property.

The law is complicated and although the facts expressed may seem to be all that is relevant, there may be many other important facts to consider. Also, the law is constantly undergoing change, so what may be correct today, may not be accurate tomorrow. Only a full consultation with an attorney experienced or knowledgeable in the specific legal subject matter is likely to result in the optimal course of action. My practice has entailed more than a 30 year span of many real estate, personal property, and bankruptcy issues. Find out more about me at: FloridaPropertyLitigation.com.

Posted

I completely agree with the answer above. You need an attorney ASAP! It is very possible that the person residing in the house will claim to own the property by adverse possession and that you have "sat on your rights" and did not act in a timely fashion to enforce your right to the property. At a minimum there will probably be claims against the property for any improvements the person has done, bills paid, etc. You need to contact an attorney right away. You absolutely need an attorney to look at this problem quickly, you might be losing this house you believed you own.

Attorney answers to questions are for general purposes only and do not establish an attorney-client relationship. The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience. Landlord/Tenant, Appellate and Criminal Defense. Robert Devin, Esq. (954) 647-5927, 200 SE 6th St., Suite 603, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301 robert@devinlawfirm.net

Asker

Posted

would conciliation be an option i solving this problem

Robert David Devin

Robert David Devin

Posted

You can ALWAYS negotiate.