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Can an IRS agent call you and tell you to pay $1,100.00 now OR we are coming to your work and arresting you for your back taxes?

San Luis Obispo, CA |

I owe the IRS about 60K in back taxes & currently working with an attorney to get a resolution. I received a call today from a man that claimed to be an IRS agent. He ask for the name and number of my attorney? I asked what it was about? He said Its about your back taxes and that he had agents on there way to my place of work to arrest me within one hour and take me to Brooklyn New York to stand trial. I asked for WHAT? He said for the the back taxes that I owed...He then said, I can postpone the matter if I can provide satisfaction. I asked what he meant, he said, make a payment. I said I only had $500.00 today, he said it would take $1,100.00. I explained I did not have $1100 today. He said well then we'll have to arrest you and hung up on me? Does this sound REAL or VALID?

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Attorney answers 4

Posted

NO! Notify your attorney of this shakedown effort.

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Richard Gordon Stack

Richard Gordon Stack

Posted

This definitely appears to be phony "IRS" call that you received. That is not the IRS operates. An IRS employee usually will not contact with the taxpayer to collect unpaid taxes by phone; it usually first contacts the taxpayer by letter and then with a personal visit (or a "field call" in IRS parlance). Although the IRS will visit your place of work, mainly when a taxpayer owes unpaid payroll taxes, an IRS collection officer (Revenue Officer) is not permitted to threaten you with jail or criminal prosecution if you don't make a payment. I suspect that some fraudster/miscreant obtained your name and contact information from a publicly recorded tax lien in an attempt to shake you down for some cash. I would report this incident to the IRS Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration ("TIGTA"). See http://www.treasury.gov/tigta/contact_report.shtml. TIGTA can then look into your report and decide whether criminal investigation of the caller is warranted. Good luck in figuring out who is behind this scheme.

Posted

It does not sound real at all. I would tell your attorney about this immediately. If this happens again I would ask the "IRS agent" for their name, employee number, and contact information, and contact your attorney with that information. This sounds very much like a scam.

Steven A. Jayson, Esq. www.jaysonlawgroup.com Office 908-258-0621 DISCLAIMER: THE ABOVE INFORMATION IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE. THIS IS GENERAL INFORMATION AND LAWS VARY FROM STATE TO STATE. PLEASE CHECK WITH A LOCAL ATTORNEY OR CONTACT THE IRS OR STATE TAXING AUTHORITY WITH ANY QUESTIONS.

Posted

It sounds like a scam to me.

Posted

This definitely appears to be phony "IRS" call that you received. That is not the IRS operates. An IRS employee usually will not contact with the taxpayer to collect unpaid taxes by phone; it usually first contacts the taxpayer by letter and then with a personal visit (or a "field call" in IRS parlance). Although the IRS will visit your place of work, mainly when a taxpayer owes unpaid payroll taxes, an IRS collection officer (Revenue Officer) is not permitted to threaten you with jail or criminal prosecution if you don't make a payment.

I suspect that some fraudster/miscreant obtained your name and contact information from a publicly recorded tax lien in an attempt to shake you down for some cash. I would report this incident to the IRS Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration ("TIGTA"). See http://www.treasury.gov/tigta/contact_report.shtml. TIGTA can then look into your report and decide whether criminal investigation of the caller is warranted.

Good luck in figuring out who is behind this scheme.

The answer to this question does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Moreover, this attorney is licensed to practiced law ONLY in the State of California. Answers to questions from users in other jurisdictions or states are meant to provide only general information. Users should contact a local attorney in their jurisdiction or state to address their specific tax issue.

Zaher Fallahi

Zaher Fallahi

Posted

I agree with Richard. Only once an IRS agent had called and threatened to put my client in jail. The client called and asked him to come and see me. The man was very arrogant and aggressive. In a very soft voice I advised him that he cannot threaten a taxpayer as he did. He started bumbling. We resolved the issue later.

Richard Gordon Stack

Richard Gordon Stack

Posted

Unfortunately, an occasional rogue IRS agent acts in that manner. When I was with the Government, one of my former colleagues informed me that the Revenue Officer assigned serve legal process upon the taxpayer in one of my cases climbed over a security gate to effect service. I then had a stern talk with that Revenue Officer and informed her that the Fourth Amendment privilege against unreasonable searches and seizures prevents her from performing her duties in that manner and that she was opening herself up to a Bivens lawsuit. When IRS agents act improperly, the best approach is to do as you did and put him in his place. It also doesn't hurt to mention that what they are doing violates the Taxpayer Bill of Rights and Section 1201 of the IRS RRA of 1998 (i.e., the co-called "10 Deadly Sins" that can result in the firing of an IRS employee). In the vast majority of cases, the IRS agents with whom I've had dealings act in an extremely professional manner.