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Can a police officer tell you no jail if you tell them details and then use use details to get warrant on residence?

Haubstadt, IN |

Police came to my boyfriends because I over purchased pseudoephedrine.They asked me to tell them who I was giving them too.They said if I would tell them I would not go to jail.They used the information to get search warrant saying I was conspiring to manufacture methamphetamine.

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Attorney answers 4

Best Answer
Posted

Unforntunately they can use this information to get a warrant.

Asker

Posted

But would this not be considered coercing ?

Posted

It should not surprise you that the police in the course of an investigation lied to you to get evidence or an admission or confession. This is why your right to remain silent is so important!

Posted

Signed agreement with the District Attorney is generally held to bind the state.

Police officers generally have no authority to bind the state.

That is why its important to keep silent and say nothing.

Curt Harrington Patent & Tax Law Attorney Certified Tax Specialist by the California Board of Legal Specialization PATENTAX.COM This communication is general information and not legal advice, and does not create an attorney-client relationship. This communication should not be relied upon as any type of legal advice. Please note that no attorney-client relationship exists between the sender and the recipient of this message in the absence of either (1) a signed fee contract and (2) remission of an agreed-upon retainer. Absent such an agreement and retainer, I am not engaged by you as an attorney, nor is any other member of my law firm.

Posted

Yes they can do this. Never, I repeat never, talk to the police.

Jeff

Asker

Posted

I did sign a waiver of rights thinking they were there for something entirely different.After signing and telling details about why I thought they were there,They tell me they are there for over purchasing pseudo.I then would not speak!The officer told me if I told them Who I was giving the pills to I would not go to jail.The officer told me he was trying to help me.This is all recorded,and he does not mentioning saying this in his affidavit for probable cause for search warrant.Is there any defense because of his actions?

Jeffrey Allan Flores

Jeffrey Allan Flores

Posted

The obvious defense, or issue for suppression is a knowing and voluntary waiver of your rights.