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Am I legally required to provide my auto insurance info to another auto insurance co?

Jacksonville, FL |

I was test driving a freind's car after mechanically working on the car as a private individual. I was involved in an accident and now my friends auto insurance co wants my auto insurance information to share in the damages. Am I legally required to provide the information to them?

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Attorney answers 3

Posted

In Florida you are required by law to exchange insurance information incident to an accident. Typically, this occurs with the other driver or law enforcement at the scene.

Additionally, you are contractually obligated to report the accident and "cooperate" with your own insurance company.

As for your friends insurance company, you don't personally have any obligations, but your friend does.

Posted

Under Florida Statute 627.4137, you are required to provide the information within 30 days of a written request. I have attached a link to the statute for your review. Additionally, your insurance policy may contain provisions requiring you to report the claim within a certain number of days. Failure to report the claim in a timely manner could result in a denial of coverage, which could leave you personally responsible for any damages resulting from the accident.

Please note: The information you obtain at this site is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. Visiting this site does not create an attorney client relationship between our firm or any of its lawyers and you. You should consult an attorney for individual advice regarding your particular situation.

Jeffrey Mark Adams

Jeffrey Mark Adams

Posted

Nice answer.

Asker

Posted

Dear Mr. Gutierrez , Please elaborate....The accident was 3 years ago and at the time of the accident, I first notified the vehicle's owner's insurance and then my personal auto insurance. I explained to my insurance co, that I had already notified the insurance co belonging to the vehicle I was borrowing for a test drive after the repair. and they told me that was fine. From a legal standpoint should they have also initiated a claim on the same accident? If so, I assume they did not since the vehicle's owner's insuracne now wants their info.

Asker

Posted

continued...To make this matter more complicated, the arriving police officer did a lousy job, completed a drivers exchange, wrote me a ticket since I rear ended the car in front of me....and nobody cared that the vehicle I struck, struck the vehicle in front of them first, and then I rear ended the middle vehicle. I called the police officer later and tried to clarify what really happened, and he said a witness stated that she saw me strike the vehicle in front of me and then the middle vehicle struck the vehicle in front of them. I assume the witness would have no reason to lie, and simply saw only the part as I struck the vehicle. As you might imagine, there were no serious injuries at the time of the accident, but now I have a car load of people claiming to be injured. (should I move abroad? kidding sorry!)

Asker

Posted

Forgive me if i'm confusing. Summary; I got in an accident in someone elses vehicle, reported the incident to the vehicle's owner's insurance co and my own insurance. The vehicles owner's insurance took over the claim and now 3 years later, that insurance co wants my personal auto insurance information. I assume since all the originally uninjured or minor injured people decided to claim they are now injured, they want or need more deep insurance pockets to pay the carload of people. Can I legally refuse them my insurance co information? Thank you.

Daniel Gutierrez

Daniel Gutierrez

Posted

There is nothing to forgive. It's understandably frustrating to deal with an accident three years after the fact, especially when there is an inaccurate accident report and you reported everything correctly the first time around. To answer your question, if the request was made in writing, then you cannot refuse. That is my opinion. Feel free to seek the opinion of others. I know this may not be the answer you want to hear. You see this as a frivolous claim - which it may be - and don't want to cooperate in any way. However, you have nothing to gain by refusing to provide your insurance information. Look at it this way: You paid for that insurance coverage, now it's time to get the benefit. Your insurance company should provide you with a defense and pay for any damages that are apportioned to you.

Posted

As a contract matter, you need to tell your own company or you will not be covered for the crash. If you tell your company they will tell the orther company. So yes you must tell them if you want coverage.

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