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What happens if you fail to appear for your jail sentence. : Friend got a speeding ticket and after appearing in court, was sentenced to a $240 fine and 2 days in Jail scheduled for a later date. This was in Wyoming and he lives in Colorado. If he doesn't show up or pay, are there any consequences if he never goes back to Wyoming?

Asked about 1 year ago in Criminal Defense

Christopher’s answer: Failure to pay a fine or complete a jail sentence may result in the suspension of your driving privileges. Most states have an agreement that if you fail to pay a fine or serve a sentence and there is a warrant, the consequence may be the suspension of your driving privileges in the state where you failed to pay or appear. That state has an agreement with your home state to suspend your privileges in your home state until you clear your driving privileges in the state where you received a ticket. You should take care of it now. Hire an attorney if you wish to appeal your sentence. Also, if there is a possibility of jail, you are entitled to an attorney at no cost to you. If you were not provided this option, you may have options to appeal. You only have a short amount of time to appeal your conviction.

Answered about 1 year ago.


Can they really bring up felony criminal charges on a $300 on line loan that is 7 years old?: 7 years ago in 2009 I incurred an online loan in the amt of $300. I have since become disabled and on Social Security. Recently I have been getting MANY calls a day from a so called mediator. They have threatened to bring felony criminal charges against me if I don't pay it immediatly! Can they really do that? I thought that they would probably try and sue me, but bring criminal felony charges up on me???? This scared me at first, but thought I would talk to someone first before I get too upset. Please help me answer this one. I am in Wyoming but the online loan was taken out in Idaho. Please help me with this.

Asked over 1 year ago in Criminal Defense

Christopher’s answer: I agree with the above answers, but you should contact a Idahoan lawyer to see if there is even a chance of a criminal charge. Also, you may want to find out if they are unlawfully ignoring the protections provided to you under the fair debt collection act. If an Idahoan lawyer tells you that there is no chance you could be arrested or prosecuted, the threat alone is a violation of 15 U.S.C. Sec. 1692(e). You may want to contact an attorney familiar with the fair debt collection act, and what your protections are.

Answered about 1 year ago.


Should he have a lawyer with him and how should we proceed from here?: My 18 (now 19) year old son was arrested in Wyoming, along with a friend, for possession of 1.75 grams marijuana. This a first offence for him, he was released on $500.00 bond and has a court date scheduled for January 14. According to the Sublet Co. court, he does not need to physically appear before the court but is able to appear virtually via video. We live in Massachusetts and are not sure how to go about obtaining legal counsel or if counsel is needed for this court appearance.

Asked over 1 year ago in Criminal Defense

Christopher’s answer: I agree with the above attorneys. It is important to know the legal ramifications of a conviction before entering a plea or proceeding to trial. Your son is entitled to an attorney. If you cannot afford one, you may ask the court to appoint one to represent your son. A criminal conviction for misdemeanor possession can prevent your son from obtaining some student aid when attending college. A conviction for marijuana possession may also impede your son's ability to gain employment in law enforcement or other areas of government. Possession of anything less than 3 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor. W.S. Sec. 35-7-1031. There is the possibility of getting the conviction deferred and dismissed pursuant to W.S. Sec. 35-7-1037. Without an attorney, it may not be an option to have the conviction deferred. Another thought is that if both individuals were charged with possession of the same marijuana, there could be a factual defense.

Answered over 1 year ago.