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How many months should I wait to re enter USA?: I stayed in California last April for 2weeks. I am planning to go to hawaii on August.

Asked 2 months ago in Immigration

Michael’s answer: Staying outside of the U.S. for three months, after having been in the U.S. for only two weeks in April, should be more than enough time spent outside of the U.S. for you to be permitted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection to re-enter the U.S. as a tourist.

Answered 2 months ago.


Urgent: H1B Visa stamping - Health problems: Hi There

I have initial visa till July 2017, when I moved to other company I got petition and I-94 till July 2018.
Due to health emergency of my family member I am planning for short India trip. If my trip is before July 2017( initial visa stamp) I.e. In next 1-2 months, can I come back without WVP/Re-Stamping in India?

please help me, I am waiting for the answer from my company Immi team also.

Thanks

Asked 2 months ago in Immigration

Michael’s answer: Based on the information that you have provided, you should be able to re-enter the U.S. prior to the expiration date of your current visa, using that visa together with the USCIS Approval Notice for your current H-1B employer and your most recent pay statement for that employer.

Answered 2 months ago.


J-1 visa expires and my boyfriend (US citizen) and I want to get married. Can I marry in my travel month? : I was wondering if I can marry him while I'm in my travel month. My visa is experired then, but I'm still legally here.

Asked 2 months ago in Immigration

Michael’s answer: You can marry your U.S. citizen boyfriend while you are in the 30-day grace period for your J-1 status and, as long as your J-1 visa is not subject to Section 212(e) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (also known as the 2-year home residency requirement, that would require you to return to your country of citizenship and spend two years there before being eligible for U.S. Permanent Residency), you and your U.S. citizen husband can file the required immigration forms with the USCIS, in order to you to apply to adjust your status to U.S. Permanent Residency. In fact, as long as you are not subject to Section 212(e) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, you could even do this after the expiration of your 30-day grace period. Please schedule a consultation with an experienced immigration lawyer for additional information and assistance.

Answered 2 months ago.