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Aaron A Pelley

Aaron Pelley’s Answers

173 total


  • How can I find out if I qualify to have my juvenile records sealed??

    I was 15 when I was charged with this crime and I was told by the court that when I turned 18 it would be off of my record. I am now 21 and I have had a background check come back with this crime on it!!!

    Aaron’s Answer

    I can help answer your questions if you want to contact our office. However, you can also look to the statute. I have included a link to the statute below.

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  • Craigslist killer- is Craigslist liable? Can hookers be charged?

    Can Craigslist be held liable for the Craigslist killer using the service to meet up with prostitutes and rob/kill them? Also, I hear that he chose hookers on Craigslist because he thought they wouldn't report the crime. Do police usually charge ...

    Aaron’s Answer

    With regards to liability, in the past, Courts have dismissed cases against Craigslist (and similar websites) by falling back on Section 230 (granting a broad federal immunity from liability for information posted on sites by users).

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  • Got a malicious mischief 3 what to i do

    what am i looking at have no criminal history

    Aaron’s Answer

    There are a number of options for an individual with zero criminal history. Meet with your attorney and discuss what the best strategy is, considering your specific facts.

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  • What are possible consequences for theft 3 charge in WA state?

    I just want to know what theft 3 is and what the max sentence would be

    Aaron’s Answer

    Below is a link that describes theft 3. It also provides the maximum sentence. It is worth noting that it is very unlikely an individual is facing the maximum sentence on a first offense.

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  • My interlock locked.. The first BAC recorded at .03. Failed again 20 minutes later at .045. Cleared 1.25 hr later.

    What are the potential consequences for interlock failure? This was my first DUI. Could the Lifesaver unit have failed? the inspection said 'no'.

    Aaron’s Answer

    Ignition Interlock failure can happen. In the past, we have argued that a single failure occurs quite easily. Mouth wash, fruits, perfumes, mints, and some foods with yeast, like pizza, can cause a false positive. We have also heard of Ignition Interlock giving a false positive when passenger in the car has consumed alcohol. Documents from the IID provider usually provide all the known issues for false positives.

    As for potential consequences, this is usually spelled out in your Judgment and Sentence and depend on a number of factors. It is often in the discretion of the Judge. The court (and/or probation) often look at the totality of the circumstances when recommending a consequence. You should contact your attorney if you anticipate challenging the IID findings.

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  • What type of crime is viloating the RCW 46.12.380

    what is the typical punishment for violating the RCW 46.12.380

    Aaron’s Answer

    There is no real typical punishment. The punishments are varied as the facts, judges, and lawyers handling the cases. A violation of 46.12.380 is a gross misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed ten thousand dollars, or by imprisonment in a county jail not to exceed one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment for each violation. However, if this is your first offense, it is highly unlikely you are facing anything near a maximum sentence. It is worth noting, the department of licensing, if you are found guilty, will suspend or revoke for up to five years the privilege of obtaining vehicle record information of a person found to be in violation of chapter 42.56 RCW, or a disclosure agreement executed with the department.

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  • Right to own a gun

    where can i go to get my gun rights back?

    Aaron’s Answer

    You need to petition the Court where the conviction occurred. I have provided a link below that may provide some insight on the process and requirements.

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  • What is the penalties for Theft 3 with malicious mischief 3 harm <$50?

    I know someone (In Kent /Wa.)that is going for arraignment for these charges and would like to know what could happen.

    Aaron’s Answer

    Below are some links that may better explain these types of charges. This should provide some insight. If your friend has questions, he/she should contact a lawyer. These cases can be resolved a number of different ways including a Stipulated Order of Continuance, Deferred, Compromise of Misdemeanor, and Trial (to name a few). Each case is unique and the potential outcomes can cover a wide range.

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  • One of my friends was charged with 3rd degree theft in washington state. What is the likely sentencing he will get?

    He has not been convicted of any crimes before this. In washington state the guidelines for 3rd degree are under $250 and the total was $632 but the company gave him a break and only filed charges for 3rd degree. He admitted to the crime and signe...

    Aaron’s Answer

    Lately, a number of 2nd degree thefts are being charged as 3rd degree. If it is his first offense, he is not likely facing jail time. However, the judge has discretion to issue jail at the time of sentencing. His sentencing could include a host of other consequences, depending on the court and judge. This could include community service or work crew, probation, consumer awareness courses and fines. The Prosecutor could offer diversion, a stipulated order of continuance, or a deferred sentence. This depends on the Prosecutor. Before paying off his obligation to the store, he should meet with his attorney and discuss all of his alternatives on how to move his case forward.

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  • WA welfare felony

    What is the statute of limitations to be charged with first degree theft (welfare fraud) over $1500 but under $5000? Washington And are there programs for first time offenders to avoid a conviction for this offense? Is jail time usually ordered?

    Aaron’s Answer

    The State has up to three years to bring charges from the date of the last (alleged) theft. It can be charged a number of different ways.

    To my knowledge, there is no program to avoid conviction for theft. However, that does not mean conviction is inevitable. Each case is unique. Meet with your attorney and he/she will examine all the different options available to you (including the likelihood of jail time).

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