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Stephanie Farr White
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Stephanie White’s Answers

341 total


  • Seeking legal custody of my niece who has been under my care since both parents have been in prison

    I have been caring for my niece( She calls me grandma) who just turn 2 last week, first her mother went to prison has been there for going on 18 months then in late Dec the father also is incarcerated and now is doing 3 years . So now my sister ...

    Stephanie’s Answer

    It sounds as though you are seeking a guardianship of your niece. You would need to file a request for temporary guardianship of the person for your niece along with guardianship of the person for your niece. These are typically filed with the juvenile division of the courts, and there is a lot of paperwork involved. The clerks at the juvenile division can help you get the paperwork that you will need.

    Stephanie White
    THE LAW OFFICE OF STEPHANIE WHITE
    Simi Valley, CA
    www.805Lawyer.com

    DISCLAIMER: The above is not legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship with the person posting the question or any person reading the above. There is no attorney-client relationship between any reader and this writer or her firm. These comments are not subject to any privilege protections. They are neither privileged nor confidential. The information is general only and should not be relied upon in any specific case. Accordingly these comments cannot be relied upon as the law and the facts may differ from those with which the reader of this communication may be dealing.

    The following disclosure is required pursuant to IRS Circular 230: unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice contained in this communication, including attachments and enclosures, is not intended or written to be used, and may not be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax-related penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein.

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  • Child support after 12 years

    when my husband and I divorced the settlement was done between us and the attorney with no court hearing involved.At that time I was granted no child support because my income was more than my ex's. How do I find out if I am now entitleted to rece...

    Stephanie’s Answer

    Even if you earn more if you spend the majority of time with the child(ren) you may have been owed child support. You cannot request back child support that hasn't been ordered. You can request you be paid child support. There is a formula for determining how much child support is owed. It is the basis for several computer programs (some counties have different programs). You can input your financial information (and his) into the program along with the amount of time the child(ren) spend with each of you, and that will determine what guideline child support would be. The court will typically impute a self-employed or work-for-cash person's income based on testimony of both parties.

    Stephanie White
    THE LAW OFFICE OF STEPHANIE WHITE
    Simi Valley, CA
    www.805Lawyer.com

    DISCLAIMER: The above is not legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship with the person posting the question or any person reading the above. There is no attorney-client relationship between any reader and this writer or her firm. These comments are not subject to any privilege protections. They are neither privileged nor confidential. The information is general only and should not be relied upon in any specific case. Accordingly these comments cannot be relied upon as the law and the facts may differ from those with which the reader of this communication may be dealing.

    The following disclosure is required pursuant to IRS Circular 230: unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice contained in this communication, including attachments and enclosures, is not intended or written to be used, and may not be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax-related penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein.

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  • My dad went to u.s. as tourist in 1990, and didn't return. is he considered legally separated with my mom

    my dad went to u.s. as tourist in 1990, and didn't return. is he considered legally separated with my mom? situation: he went to u.s. and didn't return. we kept communication with him, he sends us money, and would promise every year that he would ...

    Stephanie’s Answer

    This is more of a probate question than a question of family law. The court in California (for the purposes of family law) would determine your parents to be married and the girlfriend would have no rights. Assuming the same is true in probate court, I would think the only people other than your family who would have rights under California law would be any other children he had with the girlfriend (or with other girlfriends). I would re-issue the question under the probate heading.

    Stephanie White
    THE LAW OFFICE OF STEPHANIE WHITE
    Simi Valley, CA
    www.805Lawyer.com

    DISCLAIMER: The above is not legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship with the person posting the question or any person reading the above. There is no attorney-client relationship between any reader and this writer or her firm. These comments are not subject to any privilege protections. They are neither privileged nor confidential. The information is general only and should not be relied upon in any specific case. Accordingly these comments cannot be relied upon as the law and the facts may differ from those with which the reader of this communication may be dealing.

    The following disclosure is required pursuant to IRS Circular 230: unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice contained in this communication, including attachments and enclosures, is not intended or written to be used, and may not be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax-related penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein.

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  • Before filing chapter 7 bankruptcy i was told by both the lawyer and thier assistant that my wife would have to file too.

    the lawyer and her office manager had my wife and I both file chapter 7 even though all the debt was in my name only. My wife had very little debt. They said the banks would come after her for my debt, so she was pushed into filing too. After fili...

    Stephanie’s Answer

    Can she sue? yes. Would she win? She would have to show she was irreparably harmed. The truth is the debt acquired during marriage is community property debt, and even though it was in your name alone, the creditors could indeed go after your wife and her accounts for the money. She would have a difficult time proving that she was damaged. I don't know what "in our best interest" is referring to. If it refers to something that cost you more than the debt you discharged, then you may have a case.

    Stephanie White
    THE LAW OFFICE OF STEPHANIE WHITE
    Simi Valley, CA
    www.805Lawyer.com

    DISCLAIMER: The above is not legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship with the person posting the question or any person reading the above. There is no attorney-client relationship between any reader and this writer or her firm. These comments are not subject to any privilege protections. They are neither privileged nor confidential. The information is general only and should not be relied upon in any specific case. Accordingly these comments cannot be relied upon as the law and the facts may differ from those with which the reader of this communication may be dealing.

    The following disclosure is required pursuant to IRS Circular 230: unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice contained in this communication, including attachments and enclosures, is not intended or written to be used, and may not be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax-related penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein.

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  • Can a judge legally apply child support arrears to credit community debt?

    In our divorce hearing, we were ordered to split a credit card debt of $10,000. At that time, my ex owed me alimony & child support arrears for over a year in the amount of $8,000. The child support portion of arrears was approx. $6,000. The jud...

    Stephanie’s Answer

    I have often seen that done with pendente lite (pre-judgment) arrearages at trial or when judgment is entered.

    Stephanie White
    THE LAW OFFICE OF STEPHANIE WHITE
    Simi Valley, CA
    www.805Lawyer.com

    DISCLAIMER: The above is not legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship with the person posting the question or any person reading the above. There is no attorney-client relationship between any reader and this writer or her firm. These comments are not subject to any privilege protections. They are neither privileged nor confidential. The information is general only and should not be relied upon in any specific case. Accordingly these comments cannot be relied upon as the law and the facts may differ from those with which the reader of this communication may be dealing.

    The following disclosure is required pursuant to IRS Circular 230: unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice contained in this communication, including attachments and enclosures, is not intended or written to be used, and may not be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax-related penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein.

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  • Where can I get an attorney for a divorce on a limited income of $804/ mo. from my disability

    My husband abandoned me after almost 7 years. I've been disabled since 2000 and he left me with $3.67 after stealing $670 from me. ALL the bills are in his name and have disconnect notices. The rent is past due and I am being threatened t...

    Stephanie’s Answer

    Some area (county) bar associations have a list of attorneys who will occasionally accept pro bono (free) cases. You might check if the bar association in your area offers a program like this.

    Stephanie White
    THE LAW OFFICE OF STEPHANIE WHITE
    Simi Valley, CA
    www.805Lawyer.com

    DISCLAIMER: The above is not legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship with the person posting the question or any person reading the above. There is no attorney-client relationship between any reader and this writer or her firm. These comments are not subject to any privilege protections. They are neither privileged nor confidential. The information is general only and should not be relied upon in any specific case. Accordingly these comments cannot be relied upon as the law and the facts may differ from those with which the reader of this communication may be dealing.

    The following disclosure is required pursuant to IRS Circular 230: unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice contained in this communication, including attachments and enclosures, is not intended or written to be used, and may not be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax-related penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein.

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  • If the father of the baby is under age and does not work what can i do to get help

    father of the baby wants nothing to do with the baby

    Stephanie’s Answer

    Until the father has earnings that can be used to determine support (I'm assuming the help you are requesting is financial help), you might seek the assistance of the state Human Services Agency in your county. They have several programs to help parents of young children keep their children housed, clothed, and fed.

    Stephanie White
    THE LAW OFFICE OF STEPHANIE WHITE
    Simi Valley, CA
    www.805Lawyer.com

    DISCLAIMER: The above is not legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship with the person posting the question or any person reading the above. There is no attorney-client relationship between any reader and this writer or her firm. These comments are not subject to any privilege protections. They are neither privileged nor confidential. The information is general only and should not be relied upon in any specific case. Accordingly these comments cannot be relied upon as the law and the facts may differ from those with which the reader of this communication may be dealing.

    The following disclosure is required pursuant to IRS Circular 230: unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice contained in this communication, including attachments and enclosures, is not intended or written to be used, and may not be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax-related penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein.

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  • Step mother rights

    for the past 5-6 years i have been the primary adult involved in the child life as of school and health his dad has been there since he was born he is now 10 years old and i usually would sign all the documentations now the mom is getting in invol...

    Stephanie’s Answer

    You are not his legal guardian. Dad can't make you legal guardian. A guardian is not needed because he has a custodial parent. If Dad says it's okay for you to sign paperwork on dad's behalf and the school accepts it, then you have done nothing wrong.

    Stephanie White
    THE LAW OFFICE OF STEPHANIE WHITE
    Simi Valley, CA
    www.805Lawyer.com

    DISCLAIMER: The above is not legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship with the person posting the question or any person reading the above. There is no attorney-client relationship between any reader and this writer or her firm. These comments are not subject to any privilege protections. They are neither privileged nor confidential. The information is general only and should not be relied upon in any specific case. Accordingly these comments cannot be relied upon as the law and the facts may differ from those with which the reader of this communication may be dealing.

    The following disclosure is required pursuant to IRS Circular 230: unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice contained in this communication, including attachments and enclosures, is not intended or written to be used, and may not be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax-related penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein.

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  • What are the steps a respondent can take to finalize a divorce that has been entered in default?

    The petitioner stated she will not sign the divorce papers or take futher steps to finalize the diveorce out of spite.

    Stephanie’s Answer

    There are several things that you could do. One would be to file a request for trial setting. Another option is moving to set aside the default -- allowing you to take action in the case. You may have to pay your initial filing fee to make either of these motions/requests.

    Stephanie White
    THE LAW OFFICE OF STEPHANIE WHITE
    Simi Valley, CA
    www.805Lawyer.com

    DISCLAIMER: The above is not legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship with the person posting the question or any person reading the above. There is no attorney-client relationship between any reader and this writer or her firm. These comments are not subject to any privilege protections. They are neither privileged nor confidential. The information is general only and should not be relied upon in any specific case. Accordingly these comments cannot be relied upon as the law and the facts may differ from those with which the reader of this communication may be dealing.

    The following disclosure is required pursuant to IRS Circular 230: unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice contained in this communication, including attachments and enclosures, is not intended or written to be used, and may not be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax-related penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein.

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  • If I'm filing a move away myself, where can I find an example to follow?

    I need an example of a P & A to the court in regards to a move away order, any suggestions?

    Stephanie’s Answer

    You might try a "Practice Guide" or "Forms" publication at your local law library. Make sure that the publication and any sample you might use from it is current and based on California law.

    Stephanie White
    THE LAW OFFICE OF STEPHANIE WHITE
    Simi Valley, CA
    www.805Lawyer.com

    DISCLAIMER: The above is not legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship with the person posting the question or any person reading the above. There is no attorney-client relationship between any reader and this writer or her firm. These comments are not subject to any privilege protections. They are neither privileged nor confidential. The information is general only and should not be relied upon in any specific case. Accordingly these comments cannot be relied upon as the law and the facts may differ from those with which the reader of this communication may be dealing.

    The following disclosure is required pursuant to IRS Circular 230: unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice contained in this communication, including attachments and enclosures, is not intended or written to be used, and may not be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax-related penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein.

    See question