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Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
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  • I am a US citizen married my husband who's from France he's here in LA with me overstayed need a lawyer $2800 maximum for all.

    He's from France. He came April 23-July 23 is when passport waiver exp we married July 23. Need to get his green card and get him working ASAP

    Ronald’s Answer

    Not sure if its appropriate to discuss legal fees in this forum. Since costs (government filing fees are $1,490) i assume you want to pay legal fees of under $1,300 or so. Assuming its a "clean case" (no adverse criminal or immigration record, no affidavit of support co-sponsors required, etc.) I'm sure you'll be able to find a lawyer to prepare and file the paperwork. However, the true value of using an immigration lawyer on a case like your husband's is to have that lawyer at the interview at CIS.

    Basically, you get what you pay for.

    You'll probably have no problem getting a relatively new or inexperienced lawyer to go with you to the interview. However, I'm not sure what the value of that would be. Immigration law is quite different than other areas of the profession. Often times when I accompany a client to a marriage interview I'm afraid the client will wonder why he or she hired me in the first place: I sit in the interview room and talk to the examiner (who often times I know) and talk about the weather or the Dodgers and the interview is over in 20 or 30 minutes and my client's case is approved. Looks so easy. But its the work and preparation that went into the preparing the applications and discussing what will happen with my clients that makes it look like that. Before we walked into the room the case was reviewed and (hopefully) "approved" in the mind of the CIS officer in charge of the case. When there is an issue, rarely is an aggressive approach advisable - just the opposite of what many people think a lawyers job is. So, the point is this - there is no substitute for experience and experience may cost you a little bit more. I would be interested in reading what my colleagues have to say about this - especially any "newer" lawyers out there.

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  • What does it mean when they want to transfer him to orange county immigratin

    his in los ngeles immigratin located 300 n. los angles st in los angeles ca 90012 n the told me he goin to be transfer to orange county immigration with no bail

    Ronald’s Answer

    Assuming he's in ICE custody at 300 N. Los Angeles Street, it probably means that they will send him to a detention facility in Orange County.

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  • Can I revoke sponsorship if the person I sponsored was only trying to gain citizenship?

    The day after my soon to be ex wife received her change of status she completely changed. She falsely accused me of hitting her, had me arrested, took over my home for 2 months, stole all my belongings, drained my bank account and now we are in t...

    Ronald’s Answer

    Unfortunately, you remain obligated on the Affidavit of Sponsorship (I-864) you were required to file for her (as your spouse) even if you are divorced. Only when she becomes a U.S. citizen or leaves the U.S. (and abandons her permanent resident status) are you relieved of that obligation. If you believe that she only married you to get a green card you can file a complaint with ICE.

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  • Can I still apply for a green card?

    Hi. I'm an international student. Got pulled over for driving slow. Did the blood test. Don't know my BAC yet.. But I smoked marijuana couple of hours before my arrestation. My question is do you think If I get convicted of DUI combination of alco...

    Ronald’s Answer

    Assuming you don't have any other convictions a DUI conviction will not make you inadmissible although CIS will want a certified copy of the "record of conviction" (sometimes called "minute order").

    The marijuana is another issue.

    I strongly suggest you see a competent immigration lawyer as well as a criminal lawyer if the police press charges against you.

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  • I864 affidavit of support question...

    my wife is filing one to sponsor me but before we got married she had 2 dependents now that we are married she will no longer claim the 2... my question is, since they ask for 3 years of taxes and the dependents vary, what should she put on the I8...

    Ronald’s Answer

    The information that is correct at the time the form is signed.

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  • Can my friend act as joint sponsor.

    Can my friend act as joint sponsor. Are my friend considered as an household member. My income is not enough to meet up in sponsoring my wife, so I need a joint sponsor, but I don't have any family member here in the United States. My friends some...

    Ronald’s Answer

    A joint sponsor does not have to be related to you (or even know you for that matter). All they have to be is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, be currently living in the U.S. (there are exceptions to this) and make the level of income required to sponsor the "alien" given their number of dependents and number of previously filed affidavits of support. Even I could be your wife's sponsor - but I wouldn't want the liability!

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  • I have a conditional resident card, me and my spouse are separated, not divorce, what can i do to remove the card's conditions?

    after our first year of marriage, we got separated (frequent arguing, physical abuse form her part) but did not get a divorce, i work, she doesn't,(she is currently on welfare) we have two children who i provide for but stay with my spouse, my sec...

    Ronald’s Answer

    To get your I-751 "Joint Petition" approved (and get your 10 year green card) you do not have to show that you have a "happy" or even viable marriage. You don't necessarily have to be living together. You only have to prove that the marriage was not entered into for immigration purposes and that a 3rd person (other than a lawyer) was paid to get your conditional permanent resident status. Also, a divorce case cannot be filed and pending. You stated that you have 2 children.... assuming you and your wife are the natural parents of those children it would indicate that you did not get married for immigration purposes. So assuming your wife is willing to show up at the interview and tell truth (e.g.: she married you for reasons OTHER THAN to get you a green card) the petition should be granted. Unfortunately it won't be that easy since CIS officers basically use the "are they living together" test - which is NOT the law. You should get a qualified immigration lawyer and make sure he or she goes with you to the interview and has proof that you and your wife are the natural parents of your children.
    Ron Tasoff
    Certified Immigration Law Specialist*
    Law Offices of Tasoff and Tasoff
    16255 Ventura Blvd. Suite 1000
    Encino, California 91436
    (818) 788-8900
    ron@tasoff.com
    www.tasoff.com

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  • Applied for marriage based green card then learned I am still under J1 restriction - will the USCIS deny my application

    I got married and recently applied for green card in the US. I just learned because I'm still under the J1 restriction, my green card application won't go through. I was wondering what would happen to my application? Will the USCIS simply not acce...

    Ronald’s Answer

    I assume you are referring to the 2 year foreign residency requirement that some J-1 exchange visitors are subject to. It is CIS policy to deny the adjustment of status application if it is filed prior to either:
    1. satisfying the requirement by being physically present in your home country for 2 years

    OR

    2. obtaining a waiver of the requirement (I-612 approval).

    Basically you are inadmissible - just like someone who came illegally to the U.S. or has a serious criminal record. You need to see a qualified immigration lawyer if you intend to apply for the waiver. It is a very complex area of law and one of the most difficult waivers to get approved if you cannot get your home country to give you a "no objection letter". There is also a good chance that when your adjustment of status application is denied it will be referred to the immigration court for removal proceedings which could further complicate your case.
    Ron Tasoff
    Certified Immigration Law Specialist*
    Law Offices of Tasoff and Tasoff
    16255 Ventura Blvd. Suite 1000
    Encino, California 91436
    (818) 788-8900
    ron@tasoff.com
    www.tasoff.com
    *Immigration and Naturalization Law Specialist, California Board of Legal Specialization

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  • CITIZENSHIP APPLICATION N-400 PART 8 SECTION F-2

    hello I need some help regarding the question in part 8 section F-2 of n-400 regarding prior spouse immigration status, I am divorce for 6 yrs. and my ex husband is illegal alien or out of status when we still together. but now I have no idea wha...

    Ronald’s Answer

    You can answer that question: "Unknown".

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  • Can I Renew My L1 Visa In USA?

    My L1 Visa expired on Feb, 2013. I got my I-797 in April, and I want to know can I renew my visa (and my son's L2) in US, without going back to our foreign country? If so, what do I need to do and approximately how long does it take?

    Ronald’s Answer

    I assume you are referring to the visa stamp in your passport - not the petition which sets the period of your L-1 stay in the U.S. A visa cannot be issued or reissued in the U.S. (Once upon a time it was possible through the State Department in DC).

    So your best bet, if you're eligible is to apply for the visa at a nearby American Consulate in Mexico (Tijuana) or Canada (try Ottawa if Toronto and Vancouver are too booked up). Each post has its own rules about 3rd county nationals, so read the rules on the Consulates web site. Remember, if the visa is refused or denied you will have to to back to your home country and apply there before you can return to the U.S.

    Ron Tasoff

    Certified Immigration Law Specialist*
    Law Offices of Tasoff and Tasoff
    16255 Ventura Blvd. Suite 1000
    Encino, California 91436
    (818) 788-8900
    ron@tasoff.com
    www.tasoff.com

    *Immigration and Naturalization Law Specialist, California Board of Legal Specialization

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