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Perrin Ferrari Disner

Perrin Disner’s Answers

7 total

  • How can I sell a story to a film production company and be involved in the making process?

    I have the Idea to turn a story into a movie but I didn't write the story and this script was a tremendous success 20 years ago in Brazil's television... I spoke to the writer and he agreed to sell the rights but my question is how can I sell the ...

    Perrin’s Answer

    First you have to GET the rights. It sounds like the original writer agreed to sell the rights, but not that he DID sell (or option) the rights TO YOU. It also may not be the writer's decision, the rights might belong to the producer or the TV network. Obviously you need to figure that out right away.

    Once you've actually secured the rights, you should commit your "vision" of the thing to writing. Draft the screenplay with all the changes you have in mind, and then that's what you shop to production companies. Even as a screenwriter you won't have much power over the final product unless you negotiate for that power ahead of time (and you probably won't get much unless you have a track record in the industry, which it sounds like you don't) but if you just come to them with an "idea", then there will be other contributors along the course of the process with their own "ideas", and yours won't get any deference simply because it was first.

    You should retain an IP/entertainment lawyer right away.

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  • Is mentioning the name of a band that I was inspired by in my film legal?

    In regards to my music based film, would even mentioning that my original story was inspired by (but completely different than) my favorite band's album cause copyright issues? It's my understanding that for creative individuals, inspiration strik...

    Perrin’s Answer

    You might consider a written disclaimer in the credits stating that your film is not affiliated with or endorsed by the band. Then if you're clear that you're just a fan and they inspired you, and that's it, then you should be ok.

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  • My boss said i cant dress thats why im not getting no hours

    my boss told me that i dress horriable and if i want more hours i need to dress better if i dont dress better then i dont get more hours i work at a used fashion store

    Perrin’s Answer

    Think about it - if you were selling fashion, wouldn't you want your employees to look fashionable? In the grand scheme of things it's all a matter of taste, but it's your employer's taste that matters, not yours. Without language to the contrary in an employment contract, employment in California is "at will" and you can be fired on your employer's whim for anything that's not protected by anti-discrimination laws (race, gender, age, sexual preference, national origin, etc.). If you are a female, and you have male co-workers who dress like slobs, and you feel you are being unfairly singled out because of your gender, then you *might* have an argument that you are being discriminated against, but then again men's and women's fashions might be apples and oranges in a situation like yours - I really don't know enough about fashion to make that call, but if you think there is a gender discrimination issue, consult an attorney who specializes in that.

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  • Can one aggregate entertainment video content that was posted publicly by content creators (for marketing) on a new site?

    Many content creators (eg- TV producers, Hollywood Studios, Individuals) put out free content for purposes of drawing attention to their shows, movies, etc. to build awareness and drive tune/viewership to their IP. Is it legal in the US for someo...

    Perrin’s Answer

    The simple answer is "no". You risk subjecting yourself to liability for copyright infringement if you make any commercial use of any part of a third party's copyrighted work. The secondary benefit to the third party might suffice to gain their advance permission to use the work(s), and if you put together a well-presented proposal about this to the copyright owner, maybe they'll see things your way, but you are playing with fire if you just go ahead and do it without permission. You should retain an IP lawyer to review and advise you about the specifics of your situation.

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  • Can i be fired from my job. i had a very bad abcess, and had surgery so my doctor would not let me work. upon calling my

    employer i found out i was terminated.

    Perrin’s Answer

    If your employer had a stated policy for sick leave, and violated its own policy, you might have a good claim.

    Otherwise, bear in mind that not all states have a law concerning sick leave. California does not, for example -- employment here is "at will", meaning you can be fired if you are not otherwise protected by a sick leave policy in an employment contract or stated company policy. You should definitely seek the advice of a COLORADO attorney on this question.

    If your abscess was related to a recognized disability, you might be protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) -- another good question to ask your attorney.

    Finally, if you think you might have grown this abscess as a result of exposure to hazardous materials in the workplace, then you should look into your rights under Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA).

    Disclaimer: Please note that this answer does not constitute legal advice, and should not be relied on, since each state has different laws, each situation is fact specific, and it is impossible to evaluate a legal problem without a comprehensive consultation and review of all the facts and documents at issue. This answer does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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  • Is this wrongful termination

    my wife works in the food service industry. she was fired recently because she was sick(cough/ cold). she called in as soon as she got sick to ask for someone to cover for her. she was denied and asked to work preparing food with a cough. she fini...

    Perrin’s Answer

    Did the employer have a stated policy for sick leave? Did they follow it? If not, you could have a good case for wrongful termination.

    Otherwise, bear in mind that not all states mandate that employers provide sick leave. In California, for example, employment is considered to be "at will" unless otherwise specified. If Washington follows suit, your wife would not be protected unless by a specific povision of her employment contract or stated company policy on the subject.

    Since this is the food service industry, I think you would be doing a service to your community to inform the Washington State Board of Health that the employer's policies disregard the health of customers. But take care not to defame them! Seek advice of local counsel on how to balance your right of free speech against the employer's right to protect itself against defamation.

    Disclaimer: Please note that this answer does not constitute legal advice, and should not be relied on, since each state has different laws, each situation is fact specific, and it is impossible to evaluate a legal problem without a comprehensive consultation and review of all the facts and documents at issue. This answer does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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  • Am I allowed to publish work created in Google Sketch up?

    I am part of a student publication an am wondering what the copyright laws are for google sketch up. I have read the Terms of Service but am still confused. First it says "With the exception of Content generated by you, you may not modify, rent, l...

    Perrin’s Answer

    Any art or design that YOU create, wholesale, is your intellectual property. The language that you cite from Google is alerting you to the fact that your use of the intellectual property of a THIRD PARTY, without that party's permission, would be infringement of that party's copyright -- just as it would infringe YOUR copyright if somebody else used YOUR artwork without permission.

    The caveat about 3D Warehouse SEEMS to be Google's attempt to establish a legal buffer zone wherein derivative works -- i.e. your use of someone else's copyrighted image -- would be understood by all to be fair use. Without investigating 3D Warehouse, I can only guess that you wouldn't be able to use something in that buffer zone for your own commercial purposes.

    Over all, the point seems to be that you would be infringing a third party copyright if you were to use someone else's content for any commercial purpose.

    Disclaimer: Please note that this answer does not constitute legal advice, and should not be relied on, since each state has different laws, each situation is fact specific, and it is impossible to evaluate a legal problem without a comprehensive consultation and review of all the facts and documents at issue. This answer does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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