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Justin Jay Watling

Justin Watling’s Answers

685 total


  • Who the best legal wills provider?

    Hello, I want to know who the best legal wills provider. Legal wills are playing a very major role so I want to write my wills. My friends suggested me Alberta Wills Online but I want to know some other options so that I can hire proper legal wi...

    Justin’s Answer

    A good Will provider is one who will discuss with you the options you have available to pass your wealth at your death without have to resort to a probate process unless, after that discussion, you feel that a Will is best for you and your intended beneficiaries.

    That is something you will not find online.

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  • How do I go about obtaining a Small Estate Court Order?

    My grandmother recently passed away and had a trust. We did not need to go through Probate Court. We found a Life Insurance Policy that she was beneficiary for (belonged to her deceased husband.) They will not pay her trust, only her estate- whic...

    Justin’s Answer

    You do have another option. Assuming there is a Funeral Bill that was paid, that the value of the policy proceeds is not more than $5,000, and the amount paid on the Bill is at least the value of policy proceeds, then the person whose name appears on the Bill can file an Application For Summary Relief From Administration, with a copy of the paid Bill and a competed Form 1.0. 100$ filing fee.

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  • Why did the attorney send me a certified letter?

    My Dad's Father died and this attorney sent me a copy of the will, which I'm not in. He also sent a waiver with the will. I never responded and today I received notice about a certified letter I need to pick up. Do I have to sign that waiver? And ...

    Justin’s Answer

    It is likely that the letter is a Notice of Probate of Will. Since that mailing was made, it takes the place of Waiver signed by you. Even if you don't sign for the letter and it is returned to the attorney, that will constitute service of the Notice to you.

    Signing the Waiver does not adversely affect your right to contest the Will if you wanted to. So there really is no reason not to sign it. Your decision not to sign just means the Estate will result in little more expense (attorney fees) to administer the Estate.

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  • Do trustees of a trust ask for a visit to your apartment to discuss the trust?

    I find this odd. Requested a visit to discuss the trust. I responded with why a phone call would not do. The response was a time and date and asking would that work for you. I find it not usual. I find it not customary.

    Justin’s Answer

    One purpose of the meeting may be to deliver a copy of the Trust to you so as to comply with Ohio law.

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  • I have my adult daughters beneficiary on my retirement, insurance, etc. i would like to keep it like that...

    if i decide to get married, will i still be able to keep them as my beneficiary

    Justin’s Answer

    If it is an ERISA Plan benefit, then after marriage you should have your new spouse sign a waiver of her rights as beneficiary and the-designate your children as primary beneficiaries

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  • I am trying to contest my mothers will due to undue influence by my brother.

    My brother has a long history of aggressive behavior towards my family and raped me when I was 14. He has threatened to put mom in a home several times and had her change her will leaving him both houses. My brother was estranged for several decad...

    Justin’s Answer

    Use the Find a Lawyer option on this site

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  • Will I have to pay off my brothers house out of my inheritance?

    My mom owns her own home but bought a second home that my brother lives in and pays for and there is a survivorship deed leaving him the house but her will states we get half and half. If he still owes on the house and she holds the mortgage in he...

    Justin’s Answer

    You need to clarify the mortgage situation. Who is responsible on the Note, and to whom do the payments on the Note go?

    Also, the survivorship feature of the Deed trumps the Will. You will receive no interest in the second house since it will not be subject to probate because of the survivorship feature.

    If Mom is responsible to pay the Note, the Will may have an effect on who has to pay it.

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  • My brokerage firm is giving me conflicting responses regarding cash withdrawals from my IRA.

    My brokerage firm is giving me conflicting responses regarding cash withdrawals from my IRA. I have had to email and fax my requests and then they eventually transfer my funds to my bank. There are long weekend and holiday delays because of this. ...

    Justin’s Answer

    You fail to ask a question and you don't give enough info. What is your age? It seems cash distribution is not being requested, you are asking for a transfer. The language quoted indicates only RMDs can be EFTs, but a voluntary withdrawal prior to age 70.5 can only be effected by a check issues to you.

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  • Question regarding distribution of deceased beneficiary's share of trust.

    I recently had a family member pass away that has all of their assets in a Trust. One of the beneficiaries to receive a percentage is deceased. Correct me if I'm wrong please - but by the verbiage "In the event a beneficiary named is not then livi...

    Justin’s Answer

    You are not correct. The Will has no effect. The quoted provision means that the children of the deceased beneficiary take that beneficiary's share.

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  • Can an heir and beneficiary of a will also be the person who wrote, witnessed and notarize the will for a legally blind relative

    Can an heir and beneficiary of a will, also be the person who wrote, witnessed and notarize the will for a legally blind person?

    Justin’s Answer

    Short answer: No. The Will as described is invalid for a couple of reasons. Meet with an attorney if death has already occurred. If still living, have the person desiring to make a proper will see an attorney. The key here is to make sure his/her intentions are properly documented so they can be carried out.

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