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Ralf D. Wiedemann

Ralf Wiedemann’s Answers

3,412 total


  • How to create last will if i'm new immigrant and not living in US Yet

    How to create last will if i'm new immigrant and not living in US Yet , i have only physical mail address (virtual/forwarding address) in Texas

    Ralf’s Answer

    I would say that until you are living in the U.S. and have assets in the U.S. you do not need a will drafted under U.S. law. Once you are here, you should consult with a wills and trusts lawyer in your state of residence.

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  • My n-400 is pending, my green card is expired. I need to be in Canada for 2 days is that possible?

    I already filed my n-400 form and completed my finger prints, my green card expired. I need to go to canada for a wedding. I want to know is it possible for me to travel to Canada and back while my n-400 is pending and my green card is expired?

    Ralf’s Answer

    You could make an Infopass appointment to have a temporary green card stamp placed in our passport. However, you may be told that they will only do this after you have filed an I-90 application for a replacement green card.

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  • Can i apply for green card?

    Hello sir,i. am a 33yrs old female i am on tourist visa here.i came third time here in u.s..

    Ralf’s Answer

    If you are eligible to apply for a green card, you can do so. But you have not provided any information that suggests that you are eligible.

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  • Do I need to pay all expenses of H1B visa processing if I leave the company?

    I have been worked with my company more than two years. I have started work with my university sponsorship. My employer haven't increased my salary last two years because they have applied for H1B. After two years, I have selected for H1B and my e...

    Ralf’s Answer

    Some employers will give their H-1B workers agreements to pay liquidated damages if the employee leaves before a certain date. Most likely this is only enforceable if the employer can show that these are legitimate damages, as opposed to a penalty. You may want to consult with an employment or contract attorney if you decide to leave before the two years of H-1B time are up, to see if the agreement is enforceable.

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  • Can company sponsor Asylum applicant green card?

    My wife (Main Applicant) and I applied for Asylum about 3 years ago and waiting for interview. It's been 3 years and haven't heard anything yet for interview. I am software engineer and working with EAD on longterm contract basis. Can my employer ...

    Ralf’s Answer

    Yes, your employer can start the process for seeking a green card for you. Your employer should consult with an immigration attorney about the process and its requirements.

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  • How do I apply for E2 or L1 visa from abroad?

    I am in Asia, but want to invest or open new office in US. I never been in US. I see instructions say file forms with USCIS, but how do I do that from foreign country? Thank you.

    Ralf’s Answer

    For an E-2 visa you would apply directly with the consulate in your home country. For an L-1, your U.S. company would first need to file a petition with the USCIS. I would not recommend that you try to file a new office L-1A petition on your own. You should consult with an immigration lawyer to go over the facts of your situation and how you would document eligibility for an L-1A petition. You may also be able to apply for a B-1 visa to visit the U.S. for the purpose of making a qualifying investment for a future E-2 visa application.

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  • Another H1B transfer as I am not content with the job I am working

    Hi I recently joined a job with a new employer with H1B transfer. There is a skill mismatch at the job I am currently working on. Its been three weeks and I have 2 paystubs. Can I make one more H1B transfer now as I have attended interviews last ...

    Ralf’s Answer

    There is no restriction on the number of H-1B employers you can have, only on the total number of years (six) that you can be in H-1B status. So if you are currently in H-1B status and a new company files another H-1B petition to have you work there, that would be permissible. And should be done with the assistance of an immigration lawyer.

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  • It's been 7 weeks case was approved. I've called/emailed the NVC several times with no record for my case? How do I continue?

    My case was approved at the beginning of July and almost 2 months later they still have no record of my case. I sent a scanned copy of the approval letter with no response. How else can I move forward so I can get some answers or ensure someone ...

    Ralf’s Answer

    Sometimes the NVC is slower than usual in getting an approved petition into its system. On rare occasions the file never arrives at the NVC. You may need to engage an immigration lawyer, or ask a congressional office to assist in making an inquiry.

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  • How can I file I-130 and I-485 forms to make my undocumented parents get green card?

    I came to United States with my family about 10 years ago. We all came here with visitor visa and became undocumented by overstaying. After many years, and no I just got my US citizenship through MAVNI program (military service in army). Now I ...

    Ralf’s Answer

    If your parents still have evidence of their admission to the U.S. on visitor's visas, you may be able to simply file I-130s and I-485s. But it would be a good idea to review all the facts of your case with an immigration lawyer to make sure that there aren't any issues that are being overlooked before filing anything.

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  • Can I sue USCIS for playing around with my application for 26 years

    Son Grandson and Brother of American Citizens 1990 Filed first application in 1990 told to stay put not move not change travel planes some years later told application is not in system start again. 2003 Started 2nd application waited approx 8 ...

    Ralf’s Answer

    It's impossible to say for sure that your applications would have been handled differently if a lawyer had been representing you, but at this point if you haven't yet consulted with an immigration lawyer, it would be a good idea. To answer your question, I doubt that you would be able to sue the USCIS, but reviewing all the proceedings with a lawyer would be a good start to determine whether you could have a cause of action.

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