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Charles J. Meyer

Charles Meyer’s Answers

6 total

  • My fiance and I would like to be religiously married. We are not interested in obtaining a marriage license. Is this illegal?

    We believe a license goes against God's design for marriage. I don't really wish to debate that point. I would like to know if it is illegal to hold a ceremony that would religiously name us as husband and wife if we do not first obtain a license?...

    Charles’s Answer

    You can have a ceremony, but you would not be married. You would not be "husband and wife". It does not appear that there would be anything illegal, and you are correct that common law marriage no longer exists in Pennsylvania. You should consult with an attorney to understand if there is any impact resulting from the ceremony.

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  • What if I don't follow a custody agreement?

    My ex husband is from Turkey and as part of our custody agreement the judge ruled he may take her to Turkey for 3 weeks during the summer... I am supposed to work with him to get passport etc put together.... She doesn't want to go, I certainly do...

    Charles’s Answer

    If the court ordered the vacation period, and you do not permit it to occur, you could be held in contempt of the court order. A court could fine or even imprison you. It is a very serious issue, with respect to which you should consult an attorney to determine your options.

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  • I overpaid my child support what can i do

    I was in arrears so i continued to pay even though my children were over 18. When i finally got the approval to stop paying they have now ordered me to pay more. I sent them papers saying i paid more than i should have they disregarded them. I kee...

    Charles’s Answer

    You can request an audit from your county's Domestic Relations Office. If you are correct, you can file a Petition against the recipient to recover the overpayment.

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  • What is the legal age to choose what parent you want to live with in the state of pennsylavnnia?

    family law

    Charles’s Answer

    Custody cases are always decided based upon the "best interests of the child". As children get older, their desires carry more weight, but they never are dispositive. The Court always has the last say, and will make its determination based upon all of the available evidence. In some cases, a court may order that a custody evaluation by a psychologist be conducted to assist the court in determining the "best interests".
    You should consult with counsel in the area to assist you in determining how the judge's in your county may respond to the specific facts in your case.
    This response is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be considered legal advice.

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  • What are the child custody laws in luzerne county? The child in question is almost 13, can he be heard in court?

    We want to fight for full custody of my husband's son, and we really want to know what kind of a chance he has. We consulted an attorney in Centre County that was recommend to us by a few friends in law enforcement, but she wasn't sure of the laws...

    Charles’s Answer

    The laws in Pennsylvania related to custody are statewide, not county by county. The consideration is always the "best interests of the child". As children get older, their desires carry more weight, but they never are dispositive. The Court always has the last say, and will make its determination based upon all of the available evidence. In some cases, a court may order that a custody evaluation by a psychologist be conducted to assist the court in determining the "best interests".
    You should consult with counsel in the area to assist you in determining how the judge's in Luzerne County may respond to the specific facts in your case.
    This response is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be considered legal advice.

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  • Can I file for a fault divorce in PA?

    There are reasons why I asked my husband to leave. Its safety for me and my daughter.

    Charles’s Answer

    Pennsylvania has fault and no-fault grounds for divorce. Typically, divorces move forward under no-fault grounds, as it is emotionally and financially costly to litigate fault grounds. Further, fault is not a factor in the distribution of assets. It is a factor in the award of alimony, but only one of several factors, and does not really come into play.
    Basically, while you can file for divorce citing fault grounds, it is not cost-effective to do so.

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