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Ryan P Siney

Ryan Siney’s Answers

5 total

  • I live in Pennsylvania and I am legally separated from my husband. Can I be sued over my husband's credit card debts?

    I have filed for divorce in 2012. Was contacted by a person saying that they are going to serve me with a legal summons for a civil action for a credit card that was solely in my husband's name. My name was not on the card at all. He quit paying o...

    Ryan’s Answer

    The rights and obligations of spouses and former spouses can sometimes be unclear. You should consult an attorney if any legal action is taken against you or if the debt collector continues to harass you. The debt collector must comply with certain laws regarding debt collection, and an attorney can advise you of your rights if those laws have been violated.

    Pennsylvania is not a community property state. If you are still married, then your joint marital assets are likely held as tenants in common. When you are divorced, the property is divided equitably and you typically become either the sole owner of the property which is allocated to you or tenants in common if you continue to own property jointly. However, regardless of how your assets are held, there is an important fact that may be more important here -- a person who has not agreed to be liable for repaying a debt generally cannot be forced to repay it. Thus, unless you agreed to be responsible for repayment of the credit card debt by signing the application as a co-borrower or guarantor, it is unlikely you could be held liable. Of course, there are exceptions to every rule and you should certainly contact an attorney if this issue is not resolved. If you are disabled, you may qualify for free or reduced-fee assistance through your local legal aid office or county bar association.

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  • Is there any legal action I can take to help my situation?

    I was recently put on a site called the dirty.com. both my full name adn area where I live were posted along with random information none of which was true. It even posted a job which I dont have. In the comments for the picture there are threats ...

    Ryan’s Answer

    Based on your question, it sounds like your situation could be serious and I suggest you consult an attorney immediately if you are not successful in resolving this issue on your own. This activity could also constitute a crime and should be reported to the police. Although I don't know the specifics of your situation, in general, another person is not permitted to use your image and likeness for their own purposes without your consent. There are ways to insist that a website remove your confidential information if the information was posted without your permission or consent. You may also have recourse against the person who posted the information since it appears that the purpose for posting your information was to inflict emotional distress on you. However, enforcing your rights could require litigation, which is time consuming and expensive.

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  • What is the law called in pennslyvania that says the public has the right to know about all things of the case after the case is

    when the case is done the public can go find out info about it it becomes public knowledge

    Ryan’s Answer

    If you are seeking public records from a Pennsylvania government department or agency, then the Pennsylvania Right to Know Law may apply. The Pennsylvania Right to Know Law requires that most government records (except confidential information such as individuals' contact information, financial data and social security numbers) be made available upon request. To make a request for public records, you must submit a request in writing to the Open Records Officer for the government department or agency which holds the records you are seeking. If the records you are seeking are held by a department or agency of the federal government, then the Freedom of Information Act may apply. If you need assistance with making a request under the Right to Know Law or Freedom of Information Act, you should consult an attorney.

    Since your question mentioned a "case," you may be asking about records related to a lawsuit. Most documents filed in litigation are public records and can be obtained by visiting the office of the Prothonotary in the county where the litigation was filed. You can obtain those documents even if the litigation is still pending. However, some court documents are filed under seal, which means they are confidential and you cannot obtain copies.

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  • My LLC is in Pennsylvania, but i am moving to Florida-what do I need to do? thank you

    I am the sole proprietor of the business and all work in done over the internet

    Ryan’s Answer

    The answer to your question depends on what you plan to do with your business. There is no requirement that the member or members of a Pennsylvania LLC reside in Pennsylvania. If you plan to continue to do business in Pennsylvania, then it may be more convenient for your LLC to remain as a Pennsylvania-based LLC. If you plan to do business primarily in Florida, then, at the very least, you are likely required to register your Pennsylvania LLC as a foreign entity in Florida (and in any other states which you do business). If you do not plan to do business in Pennsylvania, then you could either dissolve your Pennsylvania LLC or seek to domesticate your LLC in Florida. Ideally, you should determine what the effect of your move will be on your business and then consult an attorney to make sure you take the appropriate steps for your LLC.

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  • Can I fight Getty Images for wanting to charge me $750 for an immage i used on my page which I took from a googled site

    I just got a demand letter from Getty Images in Seatle Washington for $750 for use of one picture, but we did not take the picture from their site and/or where we copy the picture did not have a copyright restrictions as I know that its illegal th...

    Ryan’s Answer

    The letter you received is evidence of a growing trend of enhanced protection of copyrighted works by the owner of the copyright. Although I don't know the facts of your specific situation (and can't provide you with legal advice for that reason), you could be liable to the copyright owner for copyright infringement even if there was no posted copyright notice. If you indeed infringed on the copyright, then the copyright owner may be able to sue you and win more than the $750 they are currently demanding, especially if the copyright owner can prove that you infringed upon the copyright willfully. Unfortunately, it is often more cost effective and faster to work amicably with the copyright owner to settle the dispute before a lawsuit is filed. That settlement could involve paying money to the copyright owner, agreeing to remove the picture from the places you posted it and promising never to infringe upon that company's copyrights again. If you cannot work with the copyright owner to reach a resolution, you should consult an intellectual property attorney to determine whether you have any defenses to the claim of infringement.

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