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Forrest John Crawford

Forrest Crawford’s Answers

20 total


  • Can I make the town repair my driveway

    Forrest’s Answer

    This might be a small claims issue. I would first contact the city/town/village to make a formal complaint and see if you can resolve the issue with them directly. You could then try and contact the plow company with a complaint.

    If these options don't work, get an estimate or two from local asphalt companies on the cost to repair the damage, and you may be able to sue the plow company or your city/town/village for the cost of the damage. Please note, you may want to hire an attorney, there may be laws or ordinances that complicate the situation further, or prevent you from recovering damages.

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  • Can heirs agree to modify a will?

    Forrest’s Answer

    If the heirs are in agreement, I would suggest that you pay out according to the will/statutes and have the one heir gift whatever the amount that is different to the other heir or heirs. That way you comply with the law, the will, and the wishes of the beneficiaries. Note, that this should only be done if all parties are truly in agreement. It would be possible for one party to refuse to honor the arrangement.

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  • Do I need to make out a POA for Finances?

    Forrest’s Answer

    A power of attorney for finances is a relatively simple document that can be prepared by any estate planning attorney. The purpose of this document is to designate someone to be able to act on your behalf financially. Depending on how you want this document to be drafted, this can be in effect immediately, or after you are no longer able to make decisions for yourself.

    While having your son listed as a beneficiary and co-owner of some accounts is a good first step, a well-written power of attorney for finances will cover a wide range of additional permissions that could be important if you become disabled.

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  • Can a friends mom sign a waver form for you to get your ears pierced? If they do, what are the consequences?

    Forrest’s Answer

    From a legal standpoint, I would caution against your friend's mother filling out the form and pretending to be your mother. Impersonating someone else on a waiver or in general is a bad idea.

    From a practical standpoint, have you considered going somewhere closer with your mom to get your ears pierced? Have you tried having your mother call up the piercing location and see if they would make an exception?

    Good luck! I remember the first time I got my ears pierced, it can be a lot of fun, just make sure you are doing it at a reputable place, keep your ears clean, and use some high quality starter earrings.

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  • Is it customary for a financial adviser to collect a yearly fee from the irrevocable trust he set up for me?

    Forrest’s Answer

    It can be common for a trustee to receive some sort of reasonable compensation for the management of the trust. The "rider" attached to the trust may be a schedule of the financial adviser's fees.

    If you are concerned that something inappropriate is going on, you may wish to have an attorney review your trust.

    Here is a link with some more information about trustee compensation:

    https://www.thebalance.com/how-much-does-a-successor-trustee-get-paid-3505410

    Please note, this link may not be applicable in your situation, but may help you better understand more about trustee compensation.

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  • How do I formally file a compliant about a Lawyer?

    Forrest’s Answer

    I'm sorry to hear that you have had trouble with your attorney. While $1200 for a "simple" probate case can be considered reasonable, your attorney's failure to communicate with you is a problem.

    The State Bar of Wisconsin has a web page that should help you with your issues:
    http://www.wisbar.org/forPublic/IHaveaDisputeWithMyLawyer/Pages/i-have-a-dispute-with-my-lawyer.aspx

    For more information about billing, consider reading this article:
    http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/probate-lawyers-fees-billing.html

    I hope that you are able to resolve your issues.

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  • How can I find out if my mother wrote a new will ?

    Forrest’s Answer

    There may be no need for concern. Typically a living will has to do with expressing a person's desires regarding medical treatment when they can no longer provide express informed consent. It typically does not have anything to do with the disposition of property.

    Have you tried searching the name and number online, or talking to your mother about the note?

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  • Does my sister's lawyer that she got to do it pro bono get 33% of all of our money. Even though he's only her lawyer?

    Forrest’s Answer

    Pro bono means taking on work without charge. "Low bono" means providing services at a reduced rate. It sounds like the attorney was working on a contingency basis, or had some other arrangement.

    I would check to see what kind of agreement was in place and if you have any concerns, you can contact your local state bar who might be able to refer you to someone who can help.

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  • What do I do when I know a vehicle of a deceased was transfered illegally to someone who does not have power of attorney

    Forrest’s Answer

    A power of attorney is only valid while the person is still alive. If the deceased had a will, that would control after their passing.

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  • Considering drawing up my will. Not sure of what type of will would be best for my situation.

    Forrest’s Answer

    Do you support any charities, groups, or organizations? Do you have any close friends that you may want to designate as beneficiaries on your passing? You have broad powers to designate who you want to benefit under your will. It is up to you on how you wish to distribute things, and a good estate planning attorney will help you with your goals.

    Regarding the person carrying out your will, that is called a personal representative (also sometimes referred to as executor). This can be a friend, family member, or professional. Some banks have members that can act as a representative, or you could try an attorney. Some attorneys will choose not to act as a personal representative, as there may be a conflict of interest involved. A personal representative is entitled to reasonable compensation from your estate, and for some attorneys, that can be a great deal of money due to the time involved.

    I would recommend you take some time to talk to an estate planning. They will help walk you through your options and can help you realize your goals.

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