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Aaron J. Hodukavich

Aaron Hodukavich’s Answers

23 total


  • I don't believe my son is recieving the best special education services that the district can provide.

    My son has Autism and is a special education student. We just recently moved to Lancaster, CA and he has been attending schools here. My concern is that everytime he has had an IEP meeting, it is constantly being modified in the favor of the schoo...

    Aaron’s Answer

    Federal law requires school districts to provide a “free appropriate public education” to students with disabilities. A student’s IEP does not have to be designed to maximize educational benefit, but it must be individualized to meet the student’s specific needs. Those specific needs are supposed to drive the IEP decisions, not what programs and resources the school has available. If you want to get a clear picture of what your son is entitled to and how to pursue this matter further, you should contact an education attorney licensed to practice in California. The State Bar of California provides information about lawyer referral services to get you started at http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Public/LawyerReferralServicesLRS.aspx.

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  • Using a relative's address to send your child to a school within your district, but ouside of your assigned school's boundry.

    We own a home within the district (and pay property taxes which go to the district); however, prefer a school within the district but not in the assigned school boundry. Grandma lives within the district and within the boundry of the school we pr...

    Aaron’s Answer

    Generally, a student is entitled to attend school where the student actually lives. If your child eats, sleeps, and, otherwise lives at your house in the attendance boundaries of School A, then your child is entitled to attend School A, regardless of which school you prefer. If your child eats, sleeps, and otherwise lives at grandma’s house in the attendance boundaries of School B, then your child is entitled to attend School B. One option is to request an intra-district transfer from School A to School B. The district would have the discretion to grant or deny your transfer request.

    If you want to discuss your options or pursue this matter further, you should contact an education attorney licensed to practice in Wisconsin. The State Bar of Wisconsin provide resources to help you find a lawyer at http://www.wisbar.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Finding_a_Lawyer.

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  • Aunt & Uncle taking 15 yr old to live with them until mom can move; what is needed for school and medical needs?

    We are moving and want to take my 15 yr old nephew to get him settled; his mom will be moving first of the year. What do I need to enroll him in school and seek medical attention if needed?x

    Aaron’s Answer

    This answer only addresses the school part of your question. Generally, a student is entitled to attend school in the district where he lives. As long as your nephew is actually living with you, and not there temporarily just to access a school program, he is entitled to go to the local school. You may need to have his mother sign a release to allow the school personnel to talk to you about your nephew and send his school related paperwork to you. If you want to pursue this matter further, or to get the answer to the medical side of your question, you should contact a family law or guardianship attorney licensed to practice in Texas. The State Bar of Texas has a lawyer referral service to get you started at http://www.texasbar.com/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_Lawyer&template=/Customsource/MemberDirectory/Search_form_client_main.cfm.

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  • Question regarding temporary guardianship of a disabled adult

    I just have a quick question that I hope you can answer. My mother is the guardian/trustee of my mentally disabled sister. She is 46 and has the mental capability of an 8 year old. An issue has happened and my mother and I are wondering what type ...

    Aaron’s Answer

    Generally, a guardianship will have a provision for what happens if the guardian becomes incapacitated. If the guardianship paperwork that your mother has does not provide for what happens if she becomes incapacitated, you will likely have to go through a guardianship proceeding similar to what your mother went through when she became your sister’s guardian. If you need more information, you should contact a guardianship attorney licensed to practice in Wyoming. The Wyoming State Bar provides a lawyer referral service to get you started at http://www.wyomingbar.org/directory/need_lawyer.html.

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  • Can my niece live with me and attend school without having guardianship. Her mother will be living only 20 mins away?

    I just feel me and my husband can provide a more stable place for her because her mother moves a lot she has been to 4 different schools in the last 2 years.

    Aaron’s Answer

    In general, a student is entitled to attend school in the district where the student lives. As long as the student is eating, sleeping, and otherwise actually living with you, she should be able to attend school in that district regardless of where her mother lives.

    If you want to explore your options more fully, you should contact an education, guardianship, or family law attorney licensed to practice in Arizona. The State Bar of Arizona provides and online lawyer referral service to get you started at http://www.azbar.org/findalawyer.

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  • How to keep your kid on existing elementary school - in the same school district in CA

    We are looking to save and cut costs and decided to lived together with an extended family. It is in the same city and same school district but it seems the school assigned is worst since API is below 600. Is there any way I can keep my kid to sta...

    Aaron’s Answer

    School assignments within a district are generally controlled by the district based on where the student lives. However, many school districts will consider making an intra-district transfer at the parent’s request. The transfer request is typically a form that asks for some basic information and the reason the parent wants to make the transfer. If you want to pursue a transfer, you should call your child’s school and ask about the procedure for a transfer in your district. If that doesn’t work, or you need more help, you should contact an education attorney licensed to practice in California. The State Bar of California provides a lawyer search website at http://members.calbar.ca.gov/search/member.aspx to get you started.

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  • What is the legal age group in MI that a child must attend school. in wash. its 8 to 18

    he is having a hard time. the school recommended counseling. now the principal says its that my child is spoiled and that is why he is having a hard time. recommended to not send him back. i am looking into a new school but its to late to get hi...

    Aaron’s Answer

    The Michigan Compiled Laws (MCLs) require the parent, guardian, or person responsible for a child to send the child to school from age 6 to age 18. Michigan Law makes it a misdemeanor for a person responsible for a child to fail to send the child to school regularly, unless the child fits into one of the exceptions listed in MCL 380.1561 (3). The full text of the relevant law can be found at http://legislature.mi.gov/doc.aspx?mcl-451-1976-2-24. To determine whether you are in compliance with the law, or if you want to pursue this matter further, you should contact an education attorney licensed in Michigan. The State Bar of Michigan provides a lawyer referral service at http://www.michbar.org/programs/lawyerreferral.cfm.

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  • In Oregon, does missing a certain number of school days constitute truancy?

    If so, what number of days is this for a highschooler.

    Aaron’s Answer

    Generally, Oregon law requires all children between the ages of 7 and 18 who have not received a high school diploma to maintain regular attendance at a public school full-time, with some exceptions such as private school students. The Oregon Administrative Rules define regular attendance as “attendance which does not include more than eight unexcused one-half day absences, or the equivalent thereof, in any four-week period in which the school is in session.” OAR 581-021-0077 (1)(e). If you have more questions related to your specific situation, you should contact an education attorney licensed to practice in Oregon. The Oregon State Bar provides a lawyer referral service at http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/ris.html.

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  • Can i legally submit my high school GPA and ACT score to a different school after my first year in school?

    im wanting to applay to a diferent college for next samester. can i use my high school GPA and act score, or do i have to use my college one. im 18 by the way.

    Aaron’s Answer

    Colleges and universities generally make their own entrance and application requirements. The best way to determine what documentation you need to send is to look at what the transfer application requires. If the transfer application is unclear, you should call the admissions office and ask them directly.

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  • Do I need an education lawyer?

    I am currently a Senior attending Western Oregon University's online BS in Criminal Justice Program. I was falsely accused of forging a teachers signature, unauthorized access to a class on moodle, and of sending "harassing emails" to my teac...

    Aaron’s Answer

    Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, a disability is defined as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, a record of such an impairment, or being regarded as having such an impairment. If you have a disability and you have made that disability known to WOU, WOU has an obligation to provide reasonable accommodations that enable you to access the curriculum. The Office of Disability Services is the proper office to contact to arrange accommodations. It may be worth your time to reconnect with that office and try to provide the documentation they need to arrange accommodations. If you want to pursue the other concerns you raise, you should contact an education attorney licensed to practice in Oregon. The Oregon State Bar provides a lawyer referral service to get you started, which can be found at http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/ris.

    This answer is given for informational purposes only and is NOT legal advice. This answer does not establish a lawyer-client relationship. If you need legal advice and assistance you should contact an attorney in your local area immediately.

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