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Scott Clark Murray

Scott Murray’s Answers

8 total

  • Can I sue?

    Scott’s Answer

    It's unclear from your question exactly what is going on, but it sounds as though you don't have a written lease agreement controlling the conduct of you and your landlord. Although your options are more limited in this scenario, you and the landlord are both required to comply with Wyoming law concerning the rental property.. Your best bet is to consult a local attorney who can inform you of your rights after getting the details of your situation. Good luck.

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  • What if a person finds out a crime of a said person and that said person lies and puts that person in jail to protect themselve?

    Scott’s Answer

    Unfortunately, your question doesn't provide enough clarity as to what the potential legal issues are and who is involved to elicit a helpful response on a forum like Avvo. It sounds like you already have legal representation, in which case you should take these concerns to that person immediately. The attorney-client privilege will protect your communications with your lawyer in a way that a public forum cannot. Good luck.

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  • Not sure how to go about legally kicking out a roommate?

    Scott’s Answer

    Without any agreement to the contrary, permission to remain in your apartment can be revoked at any time. Before pursuing an eviction in Wyoming courts, you'll have to provide her with a notice to vacate that complies with Wyoming law. You're potentially subjecting yourself to an eviction by allowing her to stay, provided your lease agreement prohibits non-authorized residents or guests for longer than 10 days, for example. You should contact a landlord & tenant attorney in your area to make sure you are protecting your rights.

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  • Moving to Washington state from Wyoming with a pending DUI.

    Scott’s Answer

    It sounds like hiring an experienced local attorney would be in your best interest at this point. There are a number of potential issues that could be raised, but it is difficult to fight these charges alone--especially if you are out of the state. Double check to ensure your bond conditions allow for interstate travel, not just travel within Wyoming and get in touch with an attorney before your next court date.

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  • How will contacting me effect his case?

    Scott’s Answer

    Whether and to what extent this contact will affect his case depends on a number of factors, including if he is taking his case to trial or pursuing a plea deal. If there is a no-contact order in place as either a condition of his bond or stemming from his previous conviction, that could be grounds for the State seeking to revoke bond or probation. However, it is largely a matter of prosecutorial discretion.

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  • Can the court bring up a preprobation UA five months later and use that to say I violated my probation?

    Scott’s Answer

    Until you fiance was actually placed on probation, any positive screenings may have been grounds for revoking her bond, but would not be grounds for a probation revocation. It seems from the information you've provided, however, that there may have been positive UAs or a violation of the law while she was on probation. In that case, there may be grounds for the prosecution to pursue a revocation. Either way, she should contact a local attorney ASAP.

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  • If a person is caught growing marijuana in their home, do they get charged with cultivation as well as posession ?

    Scott’s Answer

    Under Wyoming law, this person would likely be charged with a criminal statute making it "unlawful for any person to manufacture, deliver, or possess with intent to manufacture or deliver, a controlled substance..." The way the case is handled by the prosecuting attorney's office is highly dependent on the amount of marijuana in question. The person to whom you're referring should contact a local criminal attorney ASAP.

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  • How can I get out of an MIP ticket for alcohol?

    Scott’s Answer

    Unfortunately, it is not usually as simple as "getting out" of a MIP citation. The prosecuting attorney's office will not likely dismiss your case out of the kindness of their hearts. You do have rights, however, and should contact an attorney to discuss those rights. Depending on the facts and circumstances of your case, you may be able to get out of the ticket.

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