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Loraine Efron

Loraine Efron’s Answers

5 total

  • Child custody?

    Loraine’s Answer

    A lawyer will want to look at the custody and child support orders that are currently in place. If a Divorce Decree has custody and child support in it, which it usually does, then a Motion to Modify would need to be filed to start the process. A change of custody is often not easy and requires an experienced family law attorney.

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  • Do i have to work a deal with them

    Loraine’s Answer

    You need to hire an attorney. You cannot be compelled to be a "snitch" but the decision to cooperate ("snitch")) or not should be made with legal representation. I have handled situations like this many times and each case is different.

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  • What does "VA-IMPACT SENT MM"

    Loraine’s Answer

    It is hard to know what those notations mean sometimes, but that most likely refers to the victim impact statement.

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  • Can I file a law suit against a detective that lied about dates on a case against my son if he pleaded no contest ?

    Loraine’s Answer

    It is extremely unlikely that you a have a civil lawsuit against the Detective and I do not handle those kind of civil lawsuits. But with regard to your son's no contest plea, his rights to appeal the case depend on whether he entered into a plea agreement or was found guilty by a jury. Since he plead no contest, he basically choose not to contest the evidence and he has extremely limited appellate rights. If he was 16 years of age at the time of the offense, the case should have been in juvenile court and if the plea was in juvenile court, then the Court entered a finding of his age at the time of the offense. If he was 17 years of age at the time of the offense, the case would proceed in adult court. I hope that is helpful.

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  • If an intoxicated person makes a statement, and doesn't recall anything that was said , can the statement be used in court?

    Loraine’s Answer

    Intoxication is not a basis for excluding the statement. Perhaps it can be kept out on other grounds. Every case is different but generally the statement of an intoxicated person can be used, assuming it is otherwise admissible.

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