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Charlotte Angie Erdmann

Charlotte Erdmann’s Answers

2,256 total


  • How do I proceed when my former employee hasn’t given me my w2 and it’s the end of February

    Charlotte’s Answer

    Remind them of their duty to send you the w2. ask them to scan it and email to you. Can you go by their office?

    You can also request a wage and income transcript from the IRS but there is no way in knowing whether the w2 will show up on that transcript yet.

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  • What document should my joint-sponsor submit with form I-864 to show his income in 2019?

    Charlotte’s Answer

    2019 tax return is not yet due. He will likely need to include his 2017 and 2018 returns but he can also submit his last paystubs from December of 2019 as that would show his year to do income.

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  • Am I personally liable to pay late filing penalty for an 1120s?

    Charlotte’s Answer

    I agree with Mr. Gleason. You filed the tax return too close to when the bankruptcy was filed under the bankruptcy rules so you can be held personally liable for those pesky late filing penalties. BUT, depending on the facts of your case, you may be able to have those penalties abated.

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  • Do I have to tell the IRS I am married on my taxes if I would have planned to file separately anyway?

    Charlotte’s Answer

    You must be honest when you file your taxes since they are filed under penalties of perjury. That being said, you can file married filing jointly or married filing separately.

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  • Can the irs take my inheritance?

    Charlotte’s Answer

    It depends. If you and your husband filed taxes as married filing jointly than you also owe those taxes and are at risk. It also depends how your mother's will or trust is written and whether the assets are being left to you or to both of you. If she doesn't have a will or trust and they pass intestate or if they bypass those laws and rules because of the way the assets are titled, then you may be safe depending on how the assets are titled, whether the taxes were jointly filed, etc.

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  • Separation of Liability relief?

    Charlotte’s Answer

    To confirm, I am assuming you also filed married filing jointly for 2017. Whether you qualify for innocent spouse relief depends on more facts that those listed here but innocent or some kind of equitable relief may be available.

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  • Should I provide my lawyer my Notice of Tax Lien filing against my property?

    Charlotte’s Answer

    You should tell him. It is doubtful it will affect your case, but it could affect your IRS situation. You may want to consult with a tax attorney for a couple different reasons. Given your unemployment status, an attorney would be able to help you stop collection efforts for a time by the IRS. Also, an attorney could also advise you as to the taxability of any recovery of the unlawful termination employment claim. Typically, those types of settlements and recoveries are taxable however they may be a narrow exception depending on the facts of the case.

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  • How can I get a 2013 tax return from my tax preparer of that year?

    Charlotte’s Answer

    You can request a copy of the tax return from the IRS using form 4506 and paying a $50 fee. You may not be able to get a "transcript" of the 2013 return since it is so old. It is unlikely that the accountant still has a complete copy going that far back.

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  • Can a US LLC that is a capital management firm take on an investment from a foreign individual ?

    Charlotte’s Answer

    This is a complex question that cannot be answered in this format. There is also not enough information to be able to answer this question. Contact a law firm that has international tax attorneys. This is not only a tax question with regards to complex entity structures but also could have securities implications. Best of luck.

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  • Filing taxes late. Can I still get 120 day extension ?

    Charlotte’s Answer

    An extension to file is not an extension to pay. As such, you will incur failure to pay penalties and interest. If this is the first time in the last 3 years that you are late at paying (and/or filing), you may be able to get any penalty abated. The IRS will typically give you 120 days to make a payment without having to set up a formal installment agreement. It will not negate the penalties or interest. You likely have 120 days to pay before the IRS takes enforcement action (you will still get letters) without calling them ahead of time but as a courtesy, you can also call in to the IRS and request the 120 days as well.

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