Why attorneys hate giving free advice--besides the money!

Posted almost 4 years ago. 1 helpful vote

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Attorneys have a high standard set for them and a lot is expected of us: go to law school, pass the bar, do a background check, blah blah blah. But the point I'm trying to make is that whether we work pro bono (for free) or whether we charge you we are still obligated to do our job. In other words, if I give you legal advice for free, and I'm wrong, I can get into trouble anyway. If your neighbor, cousin, co-worker, friend gives you legal advice and they are wrong, they will not get into trouble. In fact, if you do something or don't do something based on what a non-attorney tells you, and it turns out they were wrong, you will be laughed at because people will think, "Why didn't you ask an attorney?" Would you ask an attorney how to fix your car or install an AC unit. No, you would ask a mechanic or a heating an air conditioning specialist. This site is great for a couple of questions and for attorneys, doctors, and clients to meet each other, but it can only go so far. Also, professionals have different opinions. So, you might ask me a question, get a little information, then ask another attorney to get a little information, then the two attorney or doctors disagree. Then what do you do? Or, you keep asking 10 different attorneys or doctors till you get the answer that you want to hear and not the correct answer then you really dig yourself in a hole. The point is we have to be very careful about what we say; it is not JUST ABOUT THE MONEY. If we are wrong, we are on the hook, not you. The jailhouse attorneys or the friends and family who are defending their home; and people in general are HAPPY TO GIVE YOU ADVICE WHEN THEY HAVE NOTHING TO LOSE. If you want good advice, get it from someone who stands to LOSE something, not just GAIN something. Thank you.

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