1. Keep all of your medical appointments and reschedule ones you have to miss as soon as possible.

  2. Tell your doctors and therapists about all of your injuries, symptoms and complaints so these can be put into the medical records.

  3. Don’t exaggerate your injuries, symptoms or complaints. The insurance company or defendant investigates each case and might conduct surveillance of you depending on your case.

  4. Keep track of time off from work and lost wages and make sure your time off and lost wages can be documented. Tell your employer that your time off is accident related.

  5. Submit your medical bills to your health insurance if you have it so your medical providers can get paid as soon as possible.

  6. Don’t use your own automobile medical payments insurance to pay your medical bills unless you talk about it with your lawyer first.

  7. Keep track of your co-pays and deductibles for medical bills, and all out of pocket expenses.

  8. Keep short notes, like on a calendar, about the effects of the accident on your daily life, such as symptoms, missed personal events, inability to sleep, and limitations. These effects are an important part of your case. These notes will help you remember.

  9. Keep the names and addresses of any witnesses to your accident and the effects of your injuries or symptoms. Keep any letters, correspondence and bills you receive because of your accident. Take photographs of your car and your injuries.

  10. Don’t talk about your case or give information about your case to anyone who contacts you. Do not sign anything if you are not sure what it is. Call your lawyer if you have any questions about this or anything else.

  11. Health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, the BWC/self insured worker compensation employers, med-pay carriers and the like usually have the right to get paid back from the case when your case is over if they paid medical bills, lost wages, disability payments or something similar.