Theft Offenses in Ohio

Posted about 2 years ago. Applies to Ohio, 1 helpful vote

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The following guide is re-posted from the Haren Law, LLC website:

Convictions based on theft offenses can carry some harsh penalties under Ohio law. For this reason, it is imperative to consult with a criminal defense attorney at the earliest stage of the prosecution or investigation. The penalties for these crimes range include prison sentences and fines. More severe offenses can carry extended prison sentences and heavy fines. Because the penalties can be harsh, it is important to consult with an Ohio criminal defense attorney as soon as possible.

Theft

The crime of theft is defined in Ohio Revised Code § 2913.02. It states that no person, with purposes to deprive the owner of property or services, shall knowingly obtain or otherwise exert control over property or services in any of the following ways:

  • Without the consent of the owner, or the person authorized to give consent.
  • Beyond the scope of consent authorized by the owner or person authorized to give consent.
  • By deception.
  • By threat.
  • By intimidation.

Theft offenses can be charged as either a misdemeanor or a felony. The level of the charge will depends on the value of the property or services that were stolen.

  • A violation of this law is a petty theft, a first degree misdemeanor.
  • If the value of the property or services stolen is at least $1,000 but less than $7,000, then a violation of this law is theft, a fifth degree felony.
  • If the value of the property or services stolen is at least $7,000 but less than $150,000, then a violation of this law is grand theft, a fourth degree felony.
  • If the value of the property or services stolen is at least $150,000 but less than $750,000, then a violation of this law is aggravated theft, a third degree felony.
  • If the value of the property or services stolen is at least $750,000 but less than $1,500,000, then a violation of this law is aggravated theft, a second degree felony.
  • If the value of the property or services stolen is at least $1,500,000, then a violation of this law is aggravated theft, a first degree felony.

Theft offenses will also be charged differently if the theft was from an elderly person or a disabled adult.

  • Theft from an elderly person or a disabled adult is a fifth degree felony.
    • If the value of the property or services stolen is at least $1,000 but less than $7,000, then a violation of this law is a fourth degree felony.
    • If the value of the property or services stolen is at least $7,000 but less than $37,500, then a violation of this law is a third degree felony.
    • If the value of the property or services stolen is at least $37,500 but less than $150,000, then a violation of this law is a second degree felony.
    • If the value of the property or services stolen is at least $150,000, then a violation of this law is a first degree felony.

Theft offenses will also be charged differently is the theft is of certain types of property.

  • If the stolen property is a motor vehicle, a violation of this law is grand theft of a motor vehicle, a fourth degree felony.
  • If the stolen property is a dangerous drug, a violation of this law is theft of drugs, a fourth degree felony. If the offender has previously been convicted of a felony drug abuse offense, it is a third degree felony.
  • If the stolen property is a police dog or horse, or an assistance animal, and the offender knows or should know that the property is such, then a violation of this law is theft of a police dog or horse or an assistance dog, a third degree felony.
  • If the stolen property is anhydrous ammonia, a violation of this law is theft of anhydrous ammonia, a third degree felony.
  • If the stolen property is gasoline from an establishment which offers it for retail sale, the offender may also be subject to a drivers license suspension.

Ohio Theft Crime Penalties

Below are the basic penalties for convictions of violent crimes in Ohio, although these basic sentences may be enhanced or amended depending on the individual circumstances of the case.

  • Misdemeanor of the First Degree – A conviction for this degree of misdemeanor can lead to 180 days in jail and/or fines up to $1,000.
  • Felony of the Fifth Degree – A person convicted of this degree of felony could face imprisonment from six months to one year and/or fines not more than $2,500.
  • Felony of the Fourth Degree – A conviction for a felony in this degree can result in imprisonment from six to 18 months, and/or fines up to $5,000.
  • Felony of the Third Degree – Offenses in this degree can result in a prison sentence from one to five years, and/or fines not exceeding $10,000.
  • Felony of the Second Degree – These offenses can lead to imprisonment from two to eight years, and/or fines no more than $15,000.
  • Felony of the First Degree – A person who is convicted for violent offenses in this degree can result in imprisonment from three to ten years, and/or fines not exceeding $20,000.

Consult an Ohio Theft Crimes Lawyer

If you would like to consult a Cleveland criminal defense attorney regarding your criminal charges, you can contact Thomas G. Haren at Haren Law, LLC at (216) 503-2232.

Also, please remember this is NOT legal advice. This is provided for informational purposes only.

Additional Resources

Haren Law, LLC Website

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