Why would you go through three years of punishment?

Law school is this wonderful, terrible experience.

I was in my junior year of college before I decided to go to law school. I was a history major trying to figure out what to do since I didn’t want to teach high school.

When I finally figured it out, I had to take the LSAT. The LSAT isn’t a terrible test. It’s a test allegedly designed to figure out if you are law school material. The scoring is between 120-180 and it tests the ability to read quickly to glean the major concepts of a passage, the ability to apply rules and standards, and the ability to break down arguments.

These are fundamental abilities needed in law school, but they are also abilities that can be learned in law school. I think the LSAT overestimates its fortune telling ability. I know people who didn’t score well on the exam who became excellent attorneys.

The next step is law school itself. The first year is set in stone. It includes Contracts, Property, Criminal Law and Torts with Legal Writing, Constitutional Law and Civil Procedure thrown in for good measure. Law school typically has two or sometimes one exam during the year. That typically makes up 50-100% of the course.

There are no majors in law school as there are in college. If a person wants to specialize in a certain field, the 2nd and 3rd years allow you to take different classes. Some go into intellectual property or tax law. I wanted to live in a courtroom, so I took evidence, trial advocacy, advanced trial advocacy as well as taking part in two trial teams. I was also a law clerk for the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office.

After three years of professors trying to open up your brain and reading sometimes over 100 pages per night, they let you graduate. But you can’t really enjoy it, because you’ve been studying for the bar exam for about a month with another month of studying to go.