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Temporary Support

Posted by attorney Jordan Gerber

The words that have been rolling around in the pit of your stomach for the last six months, and on the tip of your tongue for the last two, have courageously made their triumphant debut past your lips, “Honey, I want a divorce!" Okay, okay… maybe “honey" wasn’t the exact term shouted across the kitchen while you did everything in your power not to hurl the teapot at your former soulmate’s dome… but you get the gist. Ahh, the hard part is over. So, where is that overwhelming sense of relief your therapist promised? Or the rush of excitement thinking about your new found freedom that your best friend vowed would come? The only thoughts that seem to be racing through your mind are how the hell you are going to get by without your significant other’s help. You’ve heard horror stories about friends and neighbors divorces dragging on and on and you are suddenly trying to force the visualization of living out of a Motel 6 and feasting on a steady diet of Ramen out of your head.

Fear not, brave soul! Allow me to offer two words to offer some reprieve to your self induced panic: temporary support. A motion for temporary support, referred to as temporary relief, can ease the burdens associated with divorce during the pendency of litigation. Temporary support addresses a wide range of needs such as: child support, alimony, attorney’s fees, exclusive use and possession of the marital home, and the ability to facilitate a temporary parenting plan and timesharing schedule to help make your minor child’s transition as seamless as possible.

If you find yourself as the payor in this situation, please note that temporary support orders are not set in stone. According to Florida Statute, a court may, upon a showing of good cause, and without a showing of a substantial change of circumstances; modify, vacate, or set aside a temporary support order before or upon entering a final order in a proceeding. In fact, the modification of the temporary support order may be made retroactive to the date of the initial entry of the temporary support order or to the date of the filing of the initial or supplemental petition.

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