Probate in California

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Stephen Charles Gruber

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Probate Attorney

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Posted about 6 years ago. Applies to California, 6 helpful votes

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1

How Much Does Probate Cost?

California Probate Code section 10810 sets the maximum statutory fees that attorneys can charge for a probate. Higher fees can be ordered by a court for more complicated cases. The fees are four percent of the first $100,000 of the estate, three percent of the next $100,000, two percent of the next $800,000, one percent of the next $9,000,000, and one-half percent of the next $15,000,000. For estates larger than $25,000,000, the court will determine the fee for the amount that is greater than $25,000,000.

2

How Is the Value of the Estate Determined?

Estates are appraised by probate referees, who are appointed by the State Controller to determine the fair market value of the asset. The fair market value includes mortgages and other debts, which can result in an appraisal of the property that is higher than the equity that the deceased owned in the property. Probate referees receive a fee based on .1 percent of the assets that have been appraised.

3

How Much Are Court Costs for a Probate?

In addition to the statutory fees, there are costs for appraisal fees, publication costs, and miscellaneous fees charged by the county. A typical estate might incur $1,000 to $3,000 in court costs.

4

What Are the Advantages of Probate?

The proceedings are controlled by a judge, who can decide disputes between heirs or between the heirs and the executor. Creditors are required to submit their claims against the estate within a four-month period, provided they have been notified of the probate. The executor is required, in most cases, to prepare an accounting and report of the executor's activities.

5

What Are the Disadvantages of Probate?

The cost is usually much higher than would be required for the administration of a living trust for an estate valued at the same amount. It usually takes longer to probate an estate than to administer a trust. Most estates don't need the supervision of the court unless disputes occur.

Additional Resources

More information is available at www.ca-trusts.com

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