Parole In Place For Millitary Members

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Parole in Place Process

Parole in Place (PIP) is an administrative remedy to assist immediate relatives of U.S. military personnel who do not have legal status to become eligible to adjust status in the United States to become lawful permanent residents (and obtain a green card). Under current law, a person who has not been admitted or paroled into the U.S cannot obtain LPR status unless that individual leaves the U.S. and processes at a U.S. consulate overseas. The problem with processing with a U.S. consulate is, if you have not be admitted or paroled into the U.S. and you leave the immigration laws bar you from returning to the U.S. Parole in place remedies this by allowing you to receive a grant of parole and apply for adjustment of status without ever leaving the U.S.

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Application Process

To request parole, the alien must submit the following documentation to USCIS: - Completed Form 1-131, Application for Travel Document; - Evidence of the family relationship; - Evidence that the alien's family member is an Active Duty member of the U.S. Armed Forces, individual in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve or an individual who previously served in the U.S. Armed Forces or the Selected Reserve or the Ready Reserve; - Two identical, color, passport style photographs; and - Evidence of any additional favorable discretionary factors that the requestor wishes considered. If USCIS decides to grant parole, it will be authorized in one-year increments, with extensions of parole as appropriate.

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Who Can Apply

The fact that an individual is a spouse, child or parent of an Active Duty member of the U.S. Armed Forces, an individual in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve or an individual who previously served in the U.S. Armed Forces or the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, weighs heavily in favor of parole in place. Absent a criminal conviction or other serious adverse factors, parole in place would generally be an appropriate exercise of discretion for such an individual.

Additional Resources

USCIS.gov

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