Minnesota No-Fault Benefits: How Much is Available?

Posted almost 5 years ago. Applies to Minnesota, 10 helpful votes

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Minnesota No Fault Benefits are typically available to people that have been injured in a Minnesota car accident. This guide discusses the typical limitations / maximums available under different types of No Fault Benefit policies.

1

Medical Benefits -- Up to $20,000 Available (Under "Medical Benefits")

Medical expense benefits include all reasonable expenses for necessary medical, surgical, x-ray, optical, dental and rehabilitation services. The Minnesota No-Fault Act specifically provides for inclusion of chiropractic care. Obviously the care and treatment sought must be for the treatment of injuries that are caused by the motor vehicle accident. The type of medical care is left entirely to the injured person. The insurance company does not have the right to make a choice as to your treating physician. As long as the treatments are reasonable and necessary to cure or relieve you from the effects of the automobile accident, the insurance company remains responsible for payment up to the statutory maximum of $20,000.00.

2

Wage Loss -- Up to $20,000 Available (Under "Non-Medical Benefits")

Disability and income loss benefits provide an injured individual with compensation for 85% of the injured person's loss of income due to an inability to work as a result of their accident-related injuries. This benefit is limited to a maximum of $250.00 per week. In order to recover wage loss benefits, a treating physician must issue a written restriction confirming your inability or limited ability to work. Wage loss benefits are limited to a maximum of $20,000 total, in combination with any amounts paid for replacement services or other non-medical benefits.

3

Replacement Services -- Up to $20,000 Available (Under "Non-Medical Benefits")

Replacement service loss provide reimbursement for expenses incurred by or on behalf of the injured person in obtaining usual and necessary substitute services in lieu of those that had the injured person not been injured the they would have performed not for income but for direct personal benefit or for the benefit of the injured person's household. These tasks include laundry services, shoveling the driveway, and so on. In order to replacement service benefits, a treating physician must issue a written restriction confirming your inability or limited ability to work. Replacement service benefits are limited to a maximum of $20,000 total, in combination with any amounts paid for wage loss or other non-medical benefits.

Additional Resources

The above-detailed categories of No Fault Benefits are not exhaustive. Please check some of the links below for a more complete listing of available benefits to injured individuals. Again, consult an attorney prior to applying for any no-fault benefits or otherwise.

Minnesota No-Fault Benefits

Palmer Law Firm - No Fault Benefits Publication

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