How Police Officers are Trained to Investigate You and Get Incriminatory Information from You

William C. Head

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Criminal Defense Attorney

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Posted over 1 year ago. 1 helpful vote

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1

Your HOME is given special protections from Police Intrusion, if you know how to exercise your rights

Your HOME is given greater protection than almost every other LOCATION that you may be found, but don't mistake that RIGHT OF PRIVACY as applying to other situations. Our laws extend this high level of privacy to hotel rooms or similar "residential" places, even if temporary.

2

If not in Your Home, your Legal Protections are Generally Less Comprehensive

If you are a guest in the home, apartment or hotel room of another person you generally have LESS expectation of privacy. If you are on foot in a public place or on a public street or business parking lot - the right of an officer to approach you is fairly broad.

3

Your Car is not nearly as Secure as Your Home, from Possible Searches, so Be Prepared

Once you get into a motor vehicle, as driver or passenger, your privacy interests are more limited. That is why keeping a CLEAN vehicle (i.e., free from drugs, contraband products, stolen merchandise and concealed weapons) is IMPERATIVE. Your vehicle must NOT have visible equipment problems or registration, tag or inspection.

4

If being Followed by a Police Car that has Not Activated its Lights or Siren, Keep Driving

If an officer is following your car and has NOT turned on the emergency lights or the siren, and you pull over and stop - the officer can come up to your window to see if you are "all right" - called "community caretaking". Keep driving and following all of the rules of the road, so that no legal justification for a pullover exists. Copyright William C. Head, Atlanta, GA 2013

Additional Resources

www.theDUIbook.com www.GeorgiaCriminalDefense.com

The author's web site

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