An Overview of Eminent Domain & Condemnation In South Carolina - Table of Contents

Posted over 3 years ago. Applies to South Carolina, 3 helpful votes

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An Overview of Eminent Domain & Condemnation In South Carolina -

Table of Contents

PART 1 OF 6

Introduction

Overview

What is Condemnation?

Who can take my property?

Can the Condemnor take my property for any reason?

Who decides whether the condemnation of my property is for a public or private use?

How will I know whether the Condemnor really wants to take my property?

What can the Condemnor take?

PART 2 OF 6

The Right to Condemn

Does the Condemnor have the right to take my property?

Pre-Condemnation Planning

Should I be doing anything before my property is condemned?

If you consult an Attorney, consider asking these questions:

PART 3 OF 6

Chronology

What happens, and when, during a condemnation action?

Condemnation

Who serves on the Trial Jury?

Who serves on the Appraisal Panel?

What is a drawdown?

How do I know that my interests are protected and my concerns are being addressed?

PART 4 OF 6

Transfer of Possession

When will I be required to give up my property?

Appraising the Property

How will my property be appraised?

PART 5 OF 6

Compensation

If I don’t agree with the Condemnor’ offer, who decides how much money I get?

What am I entitled to be paid for?

Relocation Assistance

Residential Displacements

Non-Residential Displacements

Other Moving Items

PART 6 OF 6

Attorneys’ Fees & Costs

If I consult an attorney, what will it cost me?

Taxes and Tax Consequences

Do I pay taxes on the amount I receive as just compensation?

NOTICE AND DISCLAIMER

© deHolczer (http://deholczer.com/) Law PC

Additional Resources

deHolczer Law PC

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Related Topics

Residential property

Residential property is real estate that has been developed or zoned to be used for living, such as single family houses, apartments or mobile home parks.

Condemned house

A condemned house is one that does not meet building codes, and is in such poor shape that nobody can legally live in it unless and until it is repaired.

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