Will they arrest me if I go in and try to set up payment arrangements if I have warrants?

Asked over 4 years ago - San Antonio, TX

I have warrants for traffic tickets from 2007, none are for speeding,they're for expired registration, No drivers liscence(i just did'nt have it on me), no insurance, and one because my tail light was out, and failure to appear, a constable called looking for me the other day-what does this mean ,why do you think they are calling me? and will they arrest me if I go into court and try to make payment arrangements? I'm just really scared, I can't go to jail I have an Autistic son at home. What should I do?

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Paul Holt Walcutt

    Contributor Level 16

    Answered . This non-Texas lawyer has given you terrible advice. His advice might be true in California, but it's worthless here. These are not "administrative" tickets in Texas; they are Class C criminal offenses and if they have warrants attached to them, then you could be arrested on any of them. Call the court to ask them what their policy is on arresting people who come to the court to try to make payment arrangements. Almost all of the time they will not try to arrest you. Keep in mind that by paying the no insurance ticket, your license will be suspended.

    I would recommend contacting a local lawyer that handles Class C offenses. He or she may be to help you lift the warrants and minimize the number of tickets you have to plead to (especially the no insurance ticket).

  2. Edgardo Rafael Baez

    Contributor Level 18

    Answered . Since you have warrants for your arrest, I would advise you to contact a local attorney to help you remove the warrants and then take care of the tickets. Good luck and God bless you.

  3. Michael Douglas Shafer

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . Do not be afraid. If you can, consult with a criminal defense attorney who can appear for you. If not, your tickets are administrative in nature and I would not generally see someone in your position be arrested. The fact that you appear in person voluntarily will hold you in good stead.

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

28,568 answers this week

2,995 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

28,568 answers this week

2,995 attorneys answering