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Will Immigration Judges accept exhibits for a removal proceeding in form of emails by the respondent?

San Diego, CA |

The respondent is accused of marriage fraud, and the only evidence he has to prove otherwise are a few emails written by the ex husband. I am thinking what if the judge or the trial attorney claims that the emails can not be credible exhibits if the respondent can type up whatever he or she wants and bring it to the court to his or her defense when the spouse is not in court to either admit or deny the existence of emails. Has any of you dealt with the reaction of IJ's in removal proceeding when there were email evidences at hand? How was that handled? Do you think the IJ will accept emails as evidences or they might think that I the emails could have been simply typed up and there is no way to know where they came from. Please advise.

Attorney Answers 4

Posted

I would use them and see if the government attorney objects. Rules of evidence are relatively relaxed in most Immigration Courts. Hopefully you have an attorney working on your case, you should never go through removal proceedings without an experienced immigration attorney.

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Asker

Posted

ok. It just seems like something that could be assumed to have been typed by myself and presented as evidence so I was not sure if such a method would be considered as evidence regardless. thank!

Posted

It is up to the judge to decide if he/she will accept them.

Are you on the respondent's 'side' or are you hoping that he/she will get deported?

PROFESSOR OF IMMIGRATION LAW for over 10 years -- This blog posting is offered for informational purposes only. It does not constitute an attorney-client relationship. Also, keep in mind that this is an INTERNET BLOG. You should not rely on anything you read here to make decisions which impact on your life. Meet with an attorney, via Skype, or in person, to obtain competent personal and professional guidance.

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F. J. Capriotti III

F. J. Capriotti III

Posted

If you're on the respondent's 'side' ... make sure that he/she hires a lawyer. If you're not ... offer to be a witness or leave them alone.

Asker

Posted

not the respondent, so how can I offer to be a witness? thank you. the person had altered an email of mine for another case and I want to prevent the same from happening. altering evidences are illegal and i'm trying to protect myself because the other side is in a desperate situation and will do the same again..i have no doubt. not sure whom to contact to be a witness. can I object the email exhibitions myself as a witness since the person was married to me and got the conditional green card through me?

F. J. Capriotti III

F. J. Capriotti III

Posted

Contact the Office of Chief Counsel and offer to be an ICE witness. http://www.ice.gov/contact/opla/

Posted

Respondent need an immigration lawyers and soon. Removal proceedings are way too complicated an endeavor to be handled on your own. I will assure you, this is not the first question you will have on your way to the final outcome of your interaction with the immigration court system.

NYC EXPERIENCED IMMIGRATION ATTORNEYS www.myattorneyusa.com; email: info@myattorneyusa.com; Phone: (866) 456-­8654; Fax: 212-964-0440; Cell: 212-202-0325. The information contained in this answer is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter.

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Posted

The issue is whether the evidence is relevant and reliable. It appears that you would be able to establish the relevancy of the emails, since you indicate they would essentially counter the government's claim of fraud. The issue of the reliability of the evidence, which is hearsay, is where you need to focus. I would suggest that you submit the evidence along with a short brief outlining the admissibility of the emails. It would be helpful to also submit something from the email provider corroborating the authenticity of the emails. For instance, contact gmail or yahoo or whatever the provider company is and ask if they can provide any documentation verifying the email sender, receiver, date, etc. Finally, if you submit the evidence in a timely manner (usually 15 days before the hearing), and the government does not file a timely objection, you can argue that the government waived its right to object by not doing it in a timely manner as required by the immigration court's Practice Manual.

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