Why would a patient possibly being in litigation deter another doctor from seeing that patient?

Asked over 1 year ago - Homestead, FL

I made an appointment to see another doctor after adverse reaction from procedure at another hospital. Made no mention of suit or name of hospital because there is no suit. Then 2 days before appt secretary calls me and says my appt was canceled but "did I have a lawyer?" If yes, then no appt. If no, then I can see the doctor.

Attorney answers (5)

  1. Christian K. Lassen II

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    8

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Doctors don't want to get involved in litigation, as it would take them away from their practice and cost them money from lost patient revenues.

  2. George Costas Andriotis

    Contributor Level 20

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Doctors steer clear from patients who are litigating a case related to treatment. They don't want to be called as a witness or expert.

    Call for a free consultation at 727-937-1400 or visit us on the Web at www.serviceandjustice.com.
  3. Elizabeth Taylor Herd

    Pro

    Contributor Level 19

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . A subsequent treating physician can be subpoenaed to give a deposition or even testimony at trial. It is inconvenient but those physicians who are willing to advocate for their clients regardless of the impact are very special.

  4. Rixon Charles Rafter III

    Contributor Level 20

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Litigation as a subpoenaed witness can cost a doctor thousands of dollars- cancelation of appointments , impacting other patients. Some doctors offer their services as expert witnesses--they charge thousands of dollars per event.

    NOT LEGAL ADVICE. FOR EDUCATION AND INFORMATION ONLY. Mr. Rafter is licensed to practice before the state and... more
  5. David Bradley Dohner

    Contributor Level 13

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . While I agree to some extent with my colleagues who have previously provided reponses to your question, in general a subpoenaed provider can request and generally will ultimately receive adequate and more than reasonable compensation before being compelled to testify either in a courtroom or in a deposition.

    The issue which seems to be at issue here, in reality, seems fairly self-explanatory....don't you think?

    If you have sued before, or are suing, many providers...generally mistakenly....presuppose that you are litigious patient and are therefore unwilling to accept you as HIS OR HER new patient.

    LOL. Pretty simply stuff. Even if it isn't exactly sound reasoning, by and large.

    We are pleased to offer a free thirty (30) minute initial telephone consultation (simply dial {305} 972-5720), or,... more

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