Skip to main content

Why should crimes be distinguished by the motivations of the perpetrator?

Paris, TX |

I'm in college taking criminal justice and need an answer if possible. Would be greatly appreciated.

Attorney Answers 4

Posted

Crimes are distinguished by the requisite culpable mental state, not the perpetrator's motive. Please review the Texas Penal Code:

http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/PE/htm/PE.6.htm#6.03

Please mark as the best answer.

Best of Luck,

John Vong
Attorney at Law
10827 Bellaire Blvd., Ste 200
Houston, TX 77072
(832) 641-0461

DISCLAIMER This answer is for informational purposes only under the AVVO system, its terms and conditions. It is not intended as specific legal advice regarding your question. The answer could be different if all the facts were known. This answer does not establish an attorney client relationship. I am admitted only in Texas.

Mark as helpful

3 lawyers agree

Posted

They shouldn't.

Disclaimer Information on this site is provided by Brian Scott Wayson as general information, not legal advice, and use of this information does not establish an attorney-client relationship. If you have questions about your specific situation, please call an attorney.

Mark as helpful

1 lawyer agrees

Posted

Why are you in college taking criminal justice? Something worth thinking about if you are unwilling to do your own homework and to honor the Terms of Use for public service web-sites.

My responses to questions on Avvo are never intended as legal advice and must not be relied upon as legal advice. I give legal advice only in the course of an attorney-client relationship. Exchange of information through Avvo's Questions forum does not establish an attorney-client relationship with me. That relationship is established only by individual consultation and execution of a written agreement for legal services.

Mark as helpful

2 lawyers agree

Posted

Yep, you didn't "get it", but this is not the place to find it. Go to your library and check out a treatise on criminal law. Or maybe read your text again after some time to think it over. Ask this question in class -- if you are confused, probably others are also, and the instructor would like to know that.

DISCLAIMER: The forgoing comment is for general educational purposes only, and is not legal advice upon which the reader may rely as the commenter has no actual knowledge of the facts of the case, has not interviewed persons or examined evidence, and has not researched the applicable law. The comment is based only on the facts provided, which are extremely limited, and may or may not be true. Complete defenses may prevent the success of any claim. Competent legal advice should always be obtained before taking any legal action or filing suit. Readers employ any information provided herein at their own risk.

Mark as helpful

1 lawyer agrees