Skip to main content

Why does someone have an anonymity agreement with the Army and the discharge papers are withheld?

Onalaska, TX |

A female after two tours is out with no discharge papers and when a job runs a background check (criminal history) she is contacted and questioned by military authorities and cautioned about violating anonymity agreement.

Attorney Answers 4

Posted

I have never heard of a situation like you are describing. I'm not sure if you have actually seen this agreement or just been told about it, but I would be highly suspicious. It could be an effort to cover up a poor service characterization. You and her may have some misunderstanding about her responsibilities after cooperating in a military investigation.

In any event, it seems very suspect.

Andrew Cherkasky of Cherkasky Law, LLC is an Illinois attorney focused on military & criminal defense. The advice given does not form an attorney-client relationship. The advice above is intended to educate on general legal principles and theories and should not be considered state specific advice. Please call anytime, day or night, to discuss further, 703-314-6475.

Mark as helpful

2 lawyers agree

Posted

There is no such thing as an "anonymity agreement" when one gets out of the Army. Somebody is not telling somebody the truth.

Mark as helpful

2 lawyers agree

Posted

I find it hard to be that a military service member can be in fact discharged w/o discharge paperwork. An administrative discharge would not come on any criminal background check unless the service member was separated because of criminal offenses.

Mark as helpful

1 lawyer agrees

Posted

Somebody shoveling you a pile of BS.

READ THIS BEFORE CALLING OR EMAILING ME: I am licensed to practice before the state and federal courts in Virginia. We have not established an attorney-client relationship unless we have a signed representation agreement and you have paid me. I am providing educational instruction only--not legal advice. You should speak with an attorney to whom you have provided all the facts, before you take steps that may impact your legal rights. I am not obligated to answer subsequent emails or phone calls unless you have hired me. I wish you the best of luck with your situation.

Mark as helpful

1 lawyer agrees