Who is financially responsible for the care of a baby if both mother and father are minors?

Asked about 4 years ago - Sparks, NV

Mother is 15. Alleged father is 17. Mother claims to have gotten pregnant 1 month before she was due to get her 2nd Depo Provera shot. They are both still in high school. She claimed to be pregnant the day after he broke off the relationship with her. Both still live with parents and he is willing to be a part of the baby's life physically and financially so long as he is the biological father. Because they are both minors, does that make their parents financially responsible? Also, how do we know for sure that she is truly pregnant? Would be awful to destroy a 17 year old's college future because a 15 year old girl lied about being pregnant in hopes that he would stay with her.

Additional information

All medical care and expenses will be paid for by the government. He will stand up and be a man if it is truly his child. Who pays for the cost of the paternity test? He would like to know ASAP. If he is the father he wants to begin providing right away. If the paternity test is put off until after the baby is born and the results show he is not the father. 9 months of his life will have been wasted. If the test is done before the baby is born, can the mother lie about the results? His future rides on that test. Wondering which path in life he will be taking. If he is the father, he will seek full custody of his child and work to provide a good life. Public assistance is not an option. Her mother did not help by allowing them to have intercourse in her home. Why? Her son will turn 18 soon. There goes a chunk of free money. If her 15 yr old daughter has a baby, she will get free $. If he is the father, more $ will fill her pockets. He's learned his lesson and baby or not, I will be there for him 100%.

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Marshal Shawn Willick

    Contributor Level 15

    Answered . he information fro the SC attorney is accurate. The boy should do nothing, about anything, (and certainly should pay no money to anyone) until and unless paternity is established -- and in Nevada, even if a paternity action is filed, it will pretty automatically be stayed until the child is born. For information as to various items set out in your letter, see:

    http://www.willicklawgroup.com/paternity

    http://www.willicklawgroup.com/child_custody_vi...

    http://www.willicklawgroup.com/child_support

    And Nevada has no law of automatic grandparental responsibility for support. You can either sit back and wait until the possibly-made-up child is born, or confer with counsel to evaluate your possibilities now. If you do see an attorney, you should probably seek consultation with an appropriate family law specialist. I would suggest starting your search with the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, the Nevada chapter of which can be viewed at http://www.aaml.org/go/fellows/fellows-by-state....

    If you decide you would like to discuss this with one of the attorneys of this firm, please take a look at our consultation policies, procedures, and costs, at http://www.willicklawgroup.com/consultation_pol....

  2. Michael Edward Atwater

    Contributor Level 15

    Answered . If she is pregnant, then you will know it soon enough. If the boy does not believe that he is the father then he can demand a paternity test if the mother alleges his paternity and seeks for him to take legal responsibility for the support and welfare of the baby. The parents of the 15 year old are responsible for her support. That would include any medical care that she needs. Once the child comes along, the putative father can be sued for child support. Especially if the baby becomes dependent for social assistance or the mother uses social assistance for prenatal medical care and medical expenses of prenatal care, delivery or other social services.


    My comments are not intended to establish an attorney-client relationship, are not confidential, and are not intended to constitute legal advice. Proper legal advice can only be given by an attorney who agrees to represent you, who reviews the facts of your specific case, who does not have a conflict of interest preventing the representation, and who is licensed to practice in the appropriate jurisdiction where the legal issue may be filed, and who is licensed as an attorney in the state where the law applies.

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