Skip to main content

Where can we go to alert criminal defense lawyers of tactics used by law enforcement to build their cases?

Los Angeles, CA |

Law enforcement continues to concoct the most creative methods for building their cases against people to pin a crime on them. Where can people go to alert criminal defense attorneys of their evolving strategies and methods?

+ Read More

Attorney answers 3

Posted

You can try the District Attorney's office. Best of luck to you.

Malosack Berjis

Malosack Berjis

Posted

Sorry, I misread your question. In any case, I agree with Attorney Doland. Writing to a law journal is one good way.

Posted

You could write an article to any one of the hundreds of law journals in the US.

The above is general legal and business analysis. It is not "legal advice" but analysis, and different lawyers may analyse this matter differently, especially if there are additional facts not reflected in the question. I am not your attorney until retained by a written retainer agreement signed by both of us. I am only licensed in California. See also avvo.com terms and conditions item 9, incorporated as if it was reprinted here.

Asker

Posted

I felt this activity should be brought to the attention of criminal defense attorneys. Once law enforcement has decided that an individual fits the description of a crime caught on camera they will seek to create a case that will be convincing to prosecuters. Although secretly recording your face while you are in public is their most common tactic, they have some rather unorthodox methods for attempting to "establish" that the individual on camera is you. (or your client) They will record you from angles similar to the angle recorded on camera. They will secretly attempt to place objects in close proximity to you that are similar to those on camera to see if your body size is similar in proportion to such objects near the suspect they have on film. (objects could include a certain vehicle or whatever the suspect is on film near) This strengthens their case for arguing it is a particular individual if you look the same near it. Yet they are quite creative in attempting to "establish" a particular individual is the one they have on film. As crazy as this might seem, they will attempt to measure your body proportions as well. The length of your arms, the height of your legs, what your hands look like, the width of your torso and legs, they WILL secretly measure you while you are in public to attempt to "establish" your client matches the size of the suspect caught on camera. Agents will do seemingly random actions in public like parking a stroller near your legs(used to determine height or width) or walk past you using a paper they are holding to non-chalantly use to get a measurement on you. Any object, even a skateboard, can be held next to you in on the street, on a bus, in a reception room, etc to see how your various bodyparts measure up against it to determine your measurements. Once your measurements of your various bodyparts are roughly determined they can proceed to argue that you are the individual they have on camera if you have similar height, width, face, and various body measurements. In a metropolis with millions of people you are bound to share the same height, width, measurements and facial features as others. Look alike contests of celebrities often demonstrate this fact. Many contestants even sing like the celebrity the look alike contest is about. Yet law enforcement DOES use this assumption it must be you tactic to convince prosecuters and a jury that whoever they are accusing is the individual they have on film. So in all fairness I believe attorneys should be aware of this tactic used by agents to safeguard your client. I believe that law enforcement tactics, no matter how trivial or rare, should be brought to the attention of criminal defense attorneys. Our lives truly are in your hands.

Christine C McCall

Christine C McCall

Posted

None of this new and none of it is unlawful. In fact, all of these identification techniques have been dramatized in multiple television dramas and movies (most involving "mob" or organized crime plots). Prosecutors know all of this stuff as do those criminal defense attorneys who handle these kinds of criminal cases. How nefarious these techniques are depends on which end of the alleged crime you are experiencing. How about if your kid is missing? What kind of tactics do you contend "they" can use to ID the person who shows up to collect the ransom?

Kevin Lewis King

Kevin Lewis King

Posted

I always love reading your responses Ms. McCall. You have a sharp and biting wit.

Asker

Posted

Usually I would agree, but once I read various case files from the National Registry of the Exonerated I have come to realize mistakes are made far more than I had realized. Getting blamed for a crime because I fit the description concerns me. I have people who swear they know me from somewhere I havent been or that they thought I was someone else quite often.

Posted

That's why there are lots of defense attorneys!

Mr. Feasel is a former prosecutor in San Mateo County (CA) with over 10 years of criminal law experience. Nothing stated on this site shall in anyway be construed as legal advice, or as creating any attorney/client relationship. If you would like to hire Mr. Feasel to further investigate your situation, feel free to contact him thru this site.

Civil rights topics

Recommended articles about Civil rights

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer