Whats the difference between possession and attempted possession of a fictious id

Asked 6 months ago - West Jordan, UT

so my lawyer changed the wording from possession to attempted possession of a fake id, what difference does that make? for example if i were to fill out a job resume, and they ask me if ive been convicted of a dishonest act, do i say yes or no ? or is the wording irrelevant

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Glen W. Neeley

    Pro

    Contributor Level 12

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    1

    Answered . The difference is the degree of crime. I don't know all the circumstances of your case. If you're convicted of a second-degree felony, then the crime would've been reduced to a third-degree felony. If you were convicted of a third-degree felony, the crime would've been reduced to a class a misdemeanor. That is the benefit of an attempted designation. It reduces the crime one step.

  2. James Janghoon Lee

    Pro

    Contributor Level 7

    Answered . The main difference is what the attorney above explained. In reference to the job application, truth is usually a safe bet. However, if the truth hurts you, you may want to consult an attorney before answering the question. The way the question is worded can make a world of difference in how you answer the question. For example, some questions ask specifically for felonies, as opposed to misdemeanors. And some questions ask if it was a crime that you got jail time for. So it really depends..

  3. Catherine Cleveland

    Pro

    Contributor Level 10

    Answered . Changing the charge to an "attempt" should also reduce the time it takes for expungement.

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