What would be the sentence for Felony 1 robbery?

Asked over 5 years ago - Tacoma, WA

First time offense. Only priors were DUI and Drug offenses

Attorney answers (1)

  1. Jeffrey Alan Lustick

    Pro

    Contributor Level 14

    Answered . Washington felony courts follow the adult sentencing grid to determine what an offender's score will be at sentencing. The offender score is weighted to account for an offender's prior adult and juvenile felony convictions and other current offenses. In most cases, a person’s prior misdemeanor convictions do not figure into an offender score. For robbery, misdemeanor convictions are not counted in the offender score.

    Under Washington law, there are two levels of robbery: first degree and second degree. Robbery first degree is considered to be a class a violent felony and robbery second degree is a violent class b felony. Class a felonies carry a maximum punishment of up to life in prison and a $50,000 fine while class b felonies have a maximum sentence of up to ten years and a $25,000 fine. But absent particularly egregious facts, no one ever gets the maximum on their first offense.

    In your situation you have not said if the charge you are interested about was robbery 1st or robbery 2nd. Assuming no prior felonies, the sentencing range for robbery 1st is 31 to 41 months. The range for robbery 2d would be 3 to 9 months. Because the robbery 1st carries a guideline range of over a year and a day, this time would be served in a state prison and under the purview of the Washington Department of Corrections. However, since the robbery 2nd is under the benchmark 12+1 time, that sentence world in all likelihood be served in a county jail and not in prison.

    One more thing to consider is enhancements. If the robbery was committed by use of a firearm or a deadly weapon, the sentencing range can be greatly increased. These “sentencing enhancements” can result in additional time (up to 10 years in some cases) being added on to the above-stated sentences.

    This is a serious offense and you should no one rely solely on this information to make decisions in his or her case. Anyone facing this offense should consult with an attorney who can thoroughly review the situation and give clear advice based on the facts of the case.

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