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What should one say when pulled over for a DUI?

Seattle, WA |

A friend was pulled over for a DUI, and in an effort to be helpful and friendly to the office, she answered anything he asked. Is that the right strategy?


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Attorney Answers 6


  1. No. It is never a good idea in my opinion to talk to an officer when he or she is contacting you because there is a suspicion of wrong doing on your part.

    The above is not intended as legal advice. The response does not constitute the creation of an attorney client relationship as this forum does not provide for a confidential communication.


  2. EVERYTHING YOU SAY CAN AND WILL BE USED AGAINST YOU! It's that simple. The officer only asks questions that will help a conviction.

    The comments listed here do not create an attorney-client relationship. The comments are for informational purposes only and are not to be considered legal advice. This attorney is only licensed in Michigan and does not give legal advice in any other state. All comments are to be considered conversational information and you should not rely on these comments as legal advice or in place of retaining an attorney of our own. The comments here are based solely on what you have provided and therefore are general in nature and with more specific facts or details a different answer or outcome could result. The legal system is not a perfect science and this attorney does not guarantee any outcome.


  3. No. You need to give your name, license, registration, etc. You don't have to say anything else to the officer and anything you can say can be used against you. Whenever it is clear that an officer is investigation you for a crime, you should request to speak to an attorney as soon as possible.


  4. No that's the worst thing possible. Below is a post I wrote on the subject outlined why, as all the attorney here say, silence is golden.

    If and until you and I sign an Agreement for Legal Services, I am not your attorney. These answers are provided for informational and/or novelty purposes.