Skip to main content

What should I respond to my child's Gal.

Miami, FL |

Divorcing with a child and a house. Mediation failed. Gal's hearing to inform the judge about the case scheduled for this month. Gal had agreed to meet with me, and my attorney before this hearing. However, she scheduled a meeting for the day before the hearing and my attorney is booked. She later scheduled a telephone conference, but I am cancelling the telephone conference. I wanted a personal meeting with her. She is now giving me a bunch of excuses. She has only met with me once.

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

You should respond by being open, honest, and as cooperative as possible. GALs have a great deal of impact on many judges' decisions in family law matters.

Disclaimer: This email message in no way creates an attorney client relationship between Majeski Law, LLC and the recipient. Responses are general in nature and do not constitute legal advice. You should consult a lawyer regarding any specific legal matter.

Mark as helpful

4 lawyers agree

Posted

Mr. Majesky is right about the attitude you should display. Getting upset with the GAL merely over the scheduling of a conference is a bad strategy. Turn the matter over to your attorney and stay out of the process before you damage your image with the GAL and thus you and your child.

Mark as helpful

3 lawyers agree

Posted

I agree with my colleagues. Take a deep breath. She offered to meet with you. Your attorney wasn't available. If she wants to meet via phone, take the opportunity. But, please be mindful of how your actions and statements might be perceived. You have a right to be passionate, but don't be a controlling micro-manager and try to dictate when and how an independent professional will meet with you.

And, follow your attorney's advice. If you don't trust your attorney, hire a different one. But, whatever you do, try to rely on the professionals who are there to help you. They know what is customary and how to manage the case.

Even experienced civil, criminal, and corporate attorneys frequently do not know to manage a family law case. You are in a different world. Rely on your guide.

Richard J. Mockler <li><a href="http://www.familylawrights.com" rel="nofollow">Tampa Divorce Attorney</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.superlawyers.com/florida/lawyer/Richard-J-Mockler-III/9f3e82e7-95ae-482c-847d-9d85e3d032f3.html" rel="nofollow">Florida Super Lawyers Profile - Tampa Divorce Attorney</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Richard-J-Mockler-PA/63926372726" rel="nofollow">Become a Fan on Facebook</a></li> <li><a href="http://twitter.com/richard_mockler" rel="nofollow">Follow me on Twitter</a></li> <li><a href="http://familylawrights.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow">Family Law Rights Blog</a></li> <li><a href="http://militarydivorcelaw.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow">Tampa Military Divorce Blog</a></li> <li><a href="http://tampadivorcelawyer.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow">Tampa Divorce Lawyer Blog</a></li> </ul> ***If this answer was helpful, please mark it as such and remember to select a “best answer.” ***This communication does not create an attorney-client relationship. I encourage everyone to consult an independent attorney regarding any legal matters.

Mark as helpful

Divorce topics

Top tips from attorneys

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics