What is the statute of limitation to be charged with a prostitution offense in AZ?

Asked almost 2 years ago - Phoenix, AZ

A massage parlor I worked at, started to get investigated (or so I think) because the cops came in one day and took pictures of the therapists, including myself. Also, I am pretty sure undercover cops were coming in to get massages and were soliciting the therapists. Right after that, I left for good. It is been 2 months since the incident. I am fearful that if they raid or bust the place in the future, they could potentially come after me as well, even though, I have not worked there for two months now. Oh! and the place seems to still be open for business as in today.

Additional information

Update: I also want to make very clear that I was not, by any means, engaged in any illegal activity. I left the parlor when I realized the owner was hiring non-licensed girls, the police came, and I felt uncomfortable working in a place like that. I have merely asked a simple question; exercising my freedom of speech, and nothing I have said has the basis to be use against me in any way, shape or form, thanks!

Attorney answers (5)

  1. Gregg R Woodnick

    Contributor Level 12

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    Answered . While the statute of limitations is a year, generally I have seen these matters charged closer in time to the offense. If the place that you were working for is a higher end establishment, it is possible that there is a longer term investigation going on. Different cities (Phoenix, Scottsdale etc.) place differing priorities on these matters. Sometimes they push for the arrests on sex charges and other times they pursue licensing violations or both against the workers.

    You should certainly not speak to the police if contacted. Leaving the job was probably the right move. If you are still restless, which would be understandable, you should meet with an attorney soon, with the benefit of an attorney-client relationship, and vet the options.

    www.woodnicklaw.com
    Gregg R. Woodnick, PLLC
    1747 E. Morten #205
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    This general information does not create an attorney client relationship between the questioner and the author.... more
  2. James L Heard III

    Contributor Level 7

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    Answered . The State has one year to bring charges for a misdemeanor offense. The period of limitation does not run during any time when the accused is absent from the state or has no reasonably ascertainable place of abode within the state. And, if you are ever contacted by the police, do not speak to them without an attorney.

  3. Steven W Zachary

    Contributor Level 17

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    Answered . Remember you have the right to remain silent and anything you say (including on this site) can be used against you. My advice is to make sure you have the name and phone number of an attorney. If the police want to talk with you let them work through your attorney. Also, unless you are arrested stay out of trouble

  4. Paul E Knost

    Contributor Level 16

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    Answered . I agree with all of the other attorneys. The only thing I would like to stress is that you absolutely MUST refuse to speak to police if you are contacted. They will play tricks on you and call you on the telephone, acting like they want to "help" you. You will never hear Miranda warnings if they call you on the phone or trick you into coming to their station voluntarily. Even if you are completely innocent, there is nothing you can tell them that would ever help you, even if it is the absolute truth. Invoking the right to remain silent and right to a lawyer is the best thing an innocent person can do for herself.

    NONE OF THE INFORMATION PROVIDED HERE IS MEANT AS, NOR INTENDED AS LEGAL ADVICE. THE LAW IS CONSTANTLY... more
  5. Michael Douglas Shafer

    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . Your fear is well-founded. One year. They call them "therapists" now?

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