What is the statue of limitations regarding criminally charging someone for threatening your life in New York?

Asked about 1 year ago - Ithaca, NY

What is the statue of limitations regarding criminally charging someone for threatening your life in New York?

# of years
and what circumstances would make them still remain as a danger to someone's life?

Attorney answers (5)

  1. Eric Edward Rothstein

    Contributor Level 20

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . 2 years for a misdemeanor 5 for a felony.

    I am a former federal and State prosecutor and have been doing criminal defense work for over 17 years. I was... more
  2. Ernest DuBose

    Contributor Level 14

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . 5 years for a felony. They are a danger if they are still threatening your life

  3. Joyce David

    Pro

    Contributor Level 3

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . If it's a misdemeanor, the statute of limitations is two years. If it's a felony, it's five years.

  4. Stephen C. Cooper

    Contributor Level 19

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . There is no specific statute for "threatening another life". The acts could be classified as a violation (harassment) a misdemeanor (menacing & aggravated harassment) or perhaps a felony if the threat was used to gain something (coercion or extortion). The statute of limitations for felonies (except Murder) is 5 years. The Statute of Limitations for a misdemeanor is 2 years.

  5. Stephen F Wallace

    Contributor Level 19

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Under 18 USC § 3282 a Grand Jury must issue a Federal indictment within five (5) years after the defendant committed the offense.

Related Topics

Criminal defense

Criminal law establishes the classifications of crimes, how guilt or innocence is determined, and the types of punishment or rehabilitation that may be imposed.

Criminal charges

Criminal charges are formal accusations in court that someone has committed a crime. Criminal charges have many classifications and degrees of severity.

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

23,770 answers this week

2,905 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

23,770 answers this week

2,905 attorneys answering